Kiss by Z-A Studio

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Kiss by Z-A Studio

Pop-up shops might be commonplace in retail but would you consider getting married in a pop-up chapel made of cardboard?

Kiss by Z-A Studio

Top: photograph by Melissa Murphy
Above: photograph by Celine Willard

Twelve couples tied the knot beneath a temporary cardboard arch by Z-A Studio in New York's Central Park at the end of last month.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

Above: photograph by Nadia Chaudhury

The architects won a competition to design the Kiss chapel, which was constructed from 130 wedges of honeycomb cardboard.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

The structure was designed and assembled in under a week to celebrate the recently passed Marriage Equality Act of New York, which legalises same-sex marriage in the state.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

Above: photograph by Melissa Murphy

A photograph of bright red poppies printed onto billboard vinyl provided the floor of the chapel.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

This is the second Dezeen story about convenient ways to wed this summer, following a coin-operated wedding machine.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

See also: all our stories about cardboard.

Photography is by Roman Francisco, apart from where otherwise stated.

The following information is from Z-A Studio:


Kiss

Kiss is the proud winner of the Architizer + Pop Up Chapel competition. 12 couples were married in Kiss on July 30th 2011 to celebrate Marriage Equality Act of New York. Kiss was designed in two days, fabricated in three and put together in two hours at the entrance to Central Park.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

Above: photograph by Unusually Fine

Kiss is literal: two separate parts, made of the same DNA but layered differently are essentially two unique individuals that when joined together create a stable entity that is more than the sum of its parts.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

Above: photograph by Unusually Fine

Kiss is abstract: 130 components, made of the same DNA but layered differently are essentially two unique wall sections that when joined together create a stable structure that is more than the sum of its parts.

Kiss by Z-A Studio

Kiss is a playful vaulted chapel.

Kiss gages contrasting identities, it’s made of rough materials which generate delicate forms, it is sturdy like an elephant and light like a flamingo.

Give Kiss a chance!

Kiss by Z-A Studio

Above: photograph by Chiara Tiberti

The stuff Kiss is made of:

  • The chapel walls are made of stacked 96”x18”x2” honeycomb cardboard
  • The base is made of plywood
  • Everything is put together by simply using wood glue
  • The floor pattern is printed on durable adhesive vinyl (billboard material)

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Kiss has no footprint:

  • Kiss is made of recycled cardboard
  • Kiss can be re-recycled

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Kiss was concocted by: Z-A studio / Guy Zucker
Team: Harriet Bramley, Travis Lydon, Chiara Tiberti
Fabrication Assistance: Tietz-Baccon
Dimensions: 130 pieces 96”x18”x2”

  • Gareth

    "Kiss has no footprint" … no, Kiss has indeed got a footprint (if we are discussing Carboon footprint) of course it does… unless the recycled card was never manufacturered in a conventional factory, and the glue was not either, and they tranported it via magic carpet (unlikely) … It may have a small footprint, and that footprint can be offset somehow… but, I am sorry, it does *have* a footprint.

  • thorne

    marriage is increasingly a temporary institution, so why not?

  • Richard

    I dont see how this is a chapel and not anything else other than a chapel. I dont get what makes this pop-up 'thing' a chapel.

  • Kristie

    Can see a slight resemblance to a chapel arch , although the asymmetry makes it a little narrow to accommodate the bride, groom and celebrant let alone a bridal party . It also looks like guests would have a very restricted view of the ceremony. Despite this it is a very tactile and interesting structure.

  • Michal

    it only proves how the sense of sanctity has deteriorated

  • Antihero

    They should have posted more pics of lesbian couples kissing.