Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

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Rethinking the waiting room by fuelfor

Nobody likes hospital waiting rooms. Barcelona design agency Fuelfor have designed a series of conceptual improvements to make them a little more bearable.

Rethinking the waiting room by fuelfor

Their suggestions include a communal table where patients and their family can prepare for consultions, a smartphone application for patients to track their progress in the queue and a modular seating system that would allow pushchairs and wheelchairs to sit alongside family members.

Rethinking the waiting room by fuelfor

A free-standing vending machine that's styled like a kitchen counter would encourage patients to choose healthy drinks and snacks.

Rethinking the waiting room by fuelfor

Last year industrial designers Priestmangoode proposed hospital wards modelled on health spas and first class airline cabins. Watch a movie about the concept here and an interview with Paul Priestman here.

Rethinking the waiting room by fuelfor

See more design for healthcare here.

Here are some more details from Fuelfor:


Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

Waiting is a common pain point in many health systems. As resources are increasingly overstretched, some degree of waiting is inevitable for most healthcare services. And yet hospital waiting rooms tend to be some of the most uncomfortable spaces to spend time, both physically and emotionally.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

Research shows that a well designed waiting experience has the potential to improve the overall perception of a health care service and to optimise care delivery processes.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

Gathering insights through site visits to several hospitals and clinics and discussions with care givers and patients, fuelfor has created a system of furniture, interior design, service and signage concepts that aim to make the experience of waiting in healthcare positive, effective and comfortable.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

MODU is a modular furniture system that can be adapted to support different types of activities, people and facilities; elements can be reconfigured by a healthcare provider as a service evolves. Moveable arm rests and a choice of different density cushion pads allow people to create their own physical comfort zone. Wheelchair users and children in strollers have designated waiting space alongside their loved ones.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

Soft design qualities communicate comfort, but not at the expense of hygiene, with specialist material finishes ensuring safe surfaces. Active and passive air cleaning is achieved through integrated ventilation and carefully chosen plants. A queue management system provides displays at each end of the seating unit, reassuringly near to people as they wait.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

When you sit at a table its surface naturally creates a personal space around you. TABLEAU is a communal table for waiting rooms that provides social and private space for people to read, write, relax or socialise. Integrated lighting, storage and queue management displays create a dedicated area in which people can prepare or debrief after a consultation. Service staff can also use the table as an informal work space or a place for conversations with patients and loved ones.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

INLINE is an iPhone application that tells you more than just your number in the queue. You can use it to make your healthcare appointment, locate your doctor’s consultation room at the clinic, as well as make use of your waiting time for a better, more effective medical consultation.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

Features include reassuring dynamic updates of your position in the queue, a place to keep health notes, medication records and access to information about local activities for a healthier lifestyle. Simple visual interfaces make waiting time, effective time for you.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

FOLIO is a low-tech solution that helps people review and organise their medical consultation records, past and present. Important details about medications and appointments are stored in a simple paper wallet.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

Prepare and Remember cards on which people can record their personal health notes can be kept safely in one place, ready to bring to a consultation. Information is deliberately simple, visual and color-coded for easier interaction. Individual healthcare providers can always tailor the content and branding to reflect their own health care services.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

COUNTER ACT is a freestanding vending unit for the waiting room that combines a display surface for public health messages with the vending of healthy snacks and water.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

More kitchen counter than vending machine, the unit triggers people to interact and practice healthy habits in a context where they are likely to be thinking about their health.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

HEALTHPOINT is an interior architecture concept that is designed to promote healthy living, whatever your health condition or lifestage. A welcome wall as you enter introduces the doctors on duty for consultation as well as a variety of local healthy activities.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

At the rear of the space is a workshop area that can be used by local health and social care services for group meetings, classes etc... Local citizens can share their healthy tips and stories to create a living library of community health to inspire and encourage active lifestyles.

Rethinking the Waiting Room by Fuelfor

  • http://geerdesontwerpen.nl Martijn

    Cool concept, clear graphics
    but:
    'You are here' displayed on a leaflet? where is the leaflet?
    'You are here' displayed on an iPhone, but not where the iPhone is as it is indoors!
    A sign pointing A,B,C into the wall? The wall mounted vertical sign shape looks cool but results in small text. Resulting in poor legibility which should be avoided especially in a health care environment.
    So quite some development needed on the wayfinding strategy and execution side.

  • missed opportunity

    A little more bearable perhaps, but only a little.
    This could have gone so much further.
    Why so stiff and so correct?

  • http://www.farmersfurniturehq.com Alexander Moreno

    Having the phone app so that you can go somewhere else while waiting is actually incredibly useful, probably more so than all those other improvements.

  • Meadows

    The furniture design looks like a 'vitra office' adapted into a waiting area and the large table concept is reminiscent of the Bouroullec 'joyn' project.

    I don't see how the concept of sitting around a corian table on DSW chairs makes a medical appointment with the family a 'better' experience.

    It seems to lack sensitivity, comfort and intimicy.

  • http://archiendo.blogspot.com G Welch

    I just love how they have combated the problem of hospital waiting rooms by using huge amounts of plain white and all those plastic forms, much better than those sterile and unhomely Maggie Centres with their excess in warm and soft furnishings.

  • http://www.facebook.com/davide.scarpa Il Davide Scarpa

    IMHO this is a wrong solution that follows the wrong approach, that maybe it lacks identification/empathy with hospital visitors and patients. Hospitals and related behaviours should be designed as if they were taking place somewhere else, because nobody wants to be in a hospital. People just want to feel sense of safety and guarantee that they'd leave the place in a better condition.

  • http://www.smartpagers.co.uk Patient Pagers

    Hospital waiting-room design is important, but a better option is to remove the need for patients to have to wait in a congested uncomfortable area. We work with many hospitals to improve the patients waiting experience by using patient paging systems. This lets the patients wait in a a hospitals cafe or restaurant or even move outside to make a phone call. But importantly patients can be called back to the department when their appointment is ready.