Haus der Essener Geschichte
by Scheidt Kasprusch

| 11 comments

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

Following our recent feature about buildings clad in weathered steel, here's an archive in Essen, Germany, that is clad in Corten.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

Designed by German studio Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten, the four-storey building contains a public archive for the city's historical records and documents.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

The steel panels create stripes across the facade, interrupted by angled recesses concealing narrow windows.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

The Corten-clad block is an extension to a former school building, which was refurbished by the architects to provide administration rooms, a library and an exhibition area for the city archives.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

Other Corten-clad buildings from our recent feature include a winery in the south of France and a see-through church in Belgium - see all our stories about weathered steel here.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

Photography is by Deimel & Wittmar.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

Here's some more text from Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten:


Haus der Essener Geschichte
Conversion and rebuilding

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

The project comprises the reconstruction of the listed Luisenschool to be used as a library, an administration and an exhibition area and also the new construction of an archive building.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

The accurate design of the new building and also the sensitive handling of the old building were of paramount importance.
By doing so The Luisenschool turns into focus of education and history.
The overlapping utilizations of school-library-archive-exposition demonstrates a special quality and offers new opportunities.

Haus der Essener Geschichte by Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten

The corten steel tables, which cover the new archive, are made of a material that constantly alters and protects itself by corrosion.
It communicates the change of time, appears protective and alludes to the background of the City of Essen.

Awarding authority: City of Essen
Concept and development: Ahlbrecht Felix Scheidt Kasprusch Architekten
Competition: 2005, 1st award
Completion: 2010
Gross floor area: 5500 sqm
Location: Essen, Germany
Materials: new archive building: corten steel tables

  • http://www.facebook.com/pboonnao Phanprasit Boonnao

    Can I call this Brutalism?

    • Corbacci

      I am not sure you can, brutalism was called like that because raw concrete (cement brut in French) was boldy exposed. (This would be "cortenism"!) But in my opinion, even if the aesthetics of this beautiful building is brutally suggestive, there is an fundamental difference with brutalism, in that I am not sure the outside reflects the real structure of the building. The caption suggests the building is "corten-clad" and if it is really so, it's simply another example of what you may call pop architecture: a traditional building wrapped in an allusive oversized roof structure.

    • morgs77

      "Brutalism" was an architectural style characterised by extensive use of exposed concrete, usually in such a way as to give the appearance of solid massing. The name refers to the "Beton Brut" technique of texturing the dried concrete with the imprint of the timber batons used as formwork and was not intended to denote brutality, although the impact of the massive concrete housing estates, office buildings and shopping malls built during the post-war period in this style often had the effect of brutalising the urban environments in which they were erected. So no you can't. The rusty metal gives the building a kind of industrial look I suppose. I really like it.

  • jrt

    While i enjoy the aesthetic, It annoys me when there aren't any internal shots at all!

  • edward

    I'd call it brutal in this context. Not so in the winery recently posted as it's in a rural area. The original idea was a steel that wouldn't require regular maintenance but there are other choices that would not be as assertive as this.

  • http://twitter.com/ScottSowers @ScottSowers

    Rust never sleeps…

  • h.a.

    in reality brutalism was used for the fisrt time referring to architecture showing the raw reality like pipes, structure as it is without masks, lining etc. The first one is the smithson´s first school. Afterwards the brutalist architects started doing concrete structures (again the smithson´s robinhood gardens, lasdun´s buildings etc), which made the brittish hate modern architecture forever and prefer to mediocre pastish

    • Doug C.

      Hate it forever? Future Systems, Foster, Rogers, Chipperfield, Grimshaw etc..

  • http://iladyoracle.blogspot.com Ell.

    Love that weathered steel. It seems to be quite a trend. I just did a post on it here
    http://iladyoracle.blogspot.com/2011/09/rust.html

    x E.

  • http://www.facebook.com/pboonnao Phanprasit Boonnao

    As h.a. and Edward said, I think this could be categorized as brutalism.

  • http://www.zazous.co.uk/ Nick Austin

    Brutalism is more flared than this. This is more fifties than seventies. This is post post post modernism lite.

    I've got some hammerite in the garage.