Mosquito Coast Factory by Benoît-Marie Moriceau and Gaston Tolila

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Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Behind the sliding doors of a corrugated steel shed near Nantes, France, is an artist’s studio with a double-height atrium and translucent rear wall.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

French architect Gaston Tolila and artist Benoît-Marie Moriceau collaborated to design the building, which houses both accommodation and studios for resident artists.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Daylight glows through the polycarbonate back wall and filters into the atrium that runs through the centre of the building.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Staircases lead up from here to overlooking galleries on the first floor.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Studios are located on the ground floor below the galleries and facilitate woodwork, metalwork and painting.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

The building is named Mosquito Coast Factory, after a book by Peter Weir that features a metal factory in a Honduras jungle.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Other buildings from the Dezeen archive with corrugated exteriors include a film storage bunker and a house clad in red fibre-cement.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Photography is by Philippe Ruault.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Here's a little more from the architects:


Mosquito Coast Factory

A New Factory for Contemporary Art

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

The Mosquito Coast Factory is an artist’s studio located in the heart of an Industrial Development Zone (ZAC) between Nantes and Saint-Nazaire, France.  It is the fruit of collaboration between the artist Benoît-Marie Moriceau and the architect Gaston Tolila of Tolila+Gilliland.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

The project consists of a multifunctional space divided into multiple workspaces (metal, woodshop, paint studio) and living spaces (exposition, office, sleeping, bathing) permitting the artist to produce works of widely varying dimensions.  The entire atelier is bathed in natural light through the use of translucent polycarbonate on the north façade and for interior partitions.  The exterior is rendered voluntarily blank and monolithic, referencing the impersonal and mysterious qualities of the factory.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

The Life of the Atelier

The Mosquito Coast Sessions are based on the desire to create an atelier, a place for experiences and research open to different conceptions and exhibition practices.  Thought of as a kind of laboratory, this building is dedicated to receive, each year, curators and artists for exchange, experimentation and collaboration.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

The Mosquito Coast Factory also refers to a fictive architecture drawn from the eponymous novel by Paul Theroux (1981) and brought to the screen in 1986 by Peter Weir.  The story features an inventor who flees the United States for Honduras to found a utopic society.  He leaves with his entire family to the “mosquito kingdom” and builds, in the heart of the jungle, a metal block housing a vast ice factory intended to revolutionize the lives of the indigenous population.  This stage piece, a sort of projection for creative reflection and of the fantasy of a new society, here becomes a source of architectural interpretation, support and tool for potential dreams and fictions.

Mosquito Coast Factory by Tolila Gilliland

Technical Information:
Area (SHON): 517 m², Materials : Structure and cladding in galvanized steel. North Facade in polycarbonate panels (Danpalon), floors in waxed concrete.

  • martini-girl

    Possibly the least creative space for an artist I have ever seen.