The Timmelsjoch Experience Pass Museum
by Werner Tscholl

| 17 comments

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

This faceted museum in the Alps by South Tyrolean architect Werner Tscholl is precariously cantilevered.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Located along a mountain pass, the Timmelsjoch Experience Pass Museum was constructed to celebrate the road’s fiftieth anniversary.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Glass covers the internal walls of the building and is faceted to resemble the inside of an icy cave.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by the architect

A glass cabinet at the centre of the museum exhibits a scale model of the pass, while images behind the glass explain its history.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by the architect

Some other unusual museums from the Dezeen archive include one shaped like a large undulating blob and one with a softly curved shape and wide entranceway - see more museums here.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by the architect

Photography is by Jürgen Eheim, apart from where otherwise stated.

The following text was provided by the museum:


Pass Museum Opened

After its consecration as part of the celebration of the 50-year anniversary of the Timmelsjoch High Alpine Road, the interior of the Pass Museum has now been fully completed.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by Alexa Rainer

Situated at an elevation of 2,509 m, the new construction at the summit of the Timmelsjoch offers visitors quite an impressive sight. The museum, the foundations of which are on the North Tyrolean side but which protrudes 16 metres into South Tyrol, is housed in an "erratic boulder”.

The rocks and boulders around the Timmelsjoch provided the inspiration for the museum’s design. "We didn’t want to taint the mountainsides with any additional colour.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by Alexa Rainer

As a result of the careful integration of natural materials and colours, all the new elements take a back seat, as it were”, explains the renowned South Tyrolean architect Werner Tscholl with regard to the architectural concept. Tscholl was responsible, among other things, for breathing new life into the "Messner Mountain Museum Sigmundskron” near Bolzano.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by Alexa Rainer

Ice Cave

The "erratic’s” interior delivers what the Pass Museum’s exterior promises. Awaiting visitors is an "ice cave” made up of floor-to-ceiling glass formations. The historical pictures printed on the glass, (provided for the most part by Manfred Roilo), offer a striking insight into the arduous construction of the pass and the outstanding feat of achievement of the road’s pioneers.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by Alexa Rainer

Short, easy-to-read trilingual texts take visitors on a journey through the road’s history – from the early vision, to its construction, to its opening in 1959 and to its link with South Tyrol in 1968. The historic model of the road has been recreated 1:1 and is presented in a stalagmite, a glass display case.

Museum by Arch. Werner Tscholl

Above: photograph is by Alexa Rainer

Unimaginable in this day and age, the men completed the foundations of the 12 km-long high Alpine road by hand, stone for stone. Counter piece is a stalactite hanging from the ceiling which houses a further highlight. It exhibits the "fibula” (brooch) which was discovered near the summit and which provides evidence that people walked over the pass some 300 years before Christ.

  • http://www.byaccidentordesign.com Kate

    I love this. It reminds me of the Oslo Opera House: http://www.byaccidentordesign.com/cold-marble/

    • samuel

      Oh yes… it's got everything to do with the Oslo Opera House… You have a fertile imagination.

  • David

    it reminds me of the Jawas mobile scrapyard in Star Wars.

    • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

      1st pic reminded me of Shai Hulud. The spice must flow! ;)

  • Albaro Recoba

    While we all have access to google, it would be useful for some basic information like which country this project is in.

    • Tol

      Timmelsjoch Pass is in Austria. You're welcome.

      • Avagara

        Actually, it's an important question intrinsically related to the design, and I'm surprised that it wasn't mentioned in the text.

        North Tyrol is in Austria. South Tyrol is in Italy.

  • http://intimos.dk Kim J

    Cool, i hope it dosn´t fall down :D

  • Chris

    the museum is built on the boarder between italy and austria – meran (italy) on the on hand Sölden (Austria) on the other

  • Manuel

    Cantilevering, facetted rocky form and "icy" interior are not concepts… they are just forms… maybe banal metaphors … so, where is the interest in this project? . Absolutely nowhere … It is just another "cool" form. Aren´t we really tired of this?

    • Maryna

      while looking at the museum a particular person has dirty thoughts (or maybe its just me, maybe im just a simple woman), hence the form is neither cool nor interesting in an appropriate way; and i'm not tired, i'm just disappointed.

  • David3282

    I think its very interesting… From past comments many of you have stated he form is the fundamental only part to the design… but can you tell me what the inside looks like ? ?
    NO!!! Therefore how can you comment whether the form isn't part of the function of the building…

  • David3282

    I think its very interesting… From past comments many of you have stated the form is the fundamental only part to the design… but can you tell me what the inside looks like ? ? No… Therefore the form could have been generated from the function.

  • Chris

    Why do Architects just assume that because something is physically possible to create, that they should create it? I could kill myself if I wanted to, I won't though.

  • john nielsen

    WHY???!

    Is gimmickery becomming the answer for almost every new building??! – and now this months flavour: “Cantilever”. WHY?

  • http://www.kostume-4you.dk Kos tumer

    Nevermind the opera house! That looks more like one of the sand cruisers from starcraft

  • http://www.elodea.dk Jonathan

    The building looks pretty amazing! Hangs over the edge. Nice work.