Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Tenman-gū
by Kengo Kuma and Associates

| 21 comments

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Architects Kengo Kuma and Associates have installed a Starbucks coffee shop on the approach to a Shinto shrine in Dazaifu, Japan.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Over 2000 wooden batons line the interior of the shop, creating a diagonally woven lattice that spikes out beyond the recessed glass facade.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Signage for the shop nestles amongst the beams, while a strip of planted reeds marks the entrance.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

You can see more projects by Kengo Kuma here, including the competition-winning proposals for the new V&A Museum in Dundee, Scotland.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Photography is by Masao Nishikawa.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The text below is from Kengo Kuma and Associates:


Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Tenmangu Omotesando

Location of this Starbucks is somehow characteristic, as it stands on the main approach to the Dazaifu Tenmangu, one of the most major shrines in Japan. Established in 919 A.D., the shrine has been worshiped as “the God for Examination,” and receives about 2 million visitors a year who wish their success.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Along the main path to the shrine, there are traditional Japanese buildings in one or two stories. The project aimed to make a structure that harmonizes with such townscape, using a unique system of weaving thin woods diagonally.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The building is made of 2,000 stick-like parts in the sizes of 1.3m – 4m length and 6cm section. Total length of the sticks reached as far as 4.4km.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

We had experimented the weaving of sticks for the project of Chidori and GC Prostho Museum Research Center, and this time we tried the diagonal weaving in order to bring in a sense of direction and fluidity.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Three sticks are joined at one point in Chidori and GC, while in Starbucks four steps come to one point because of the diagonal – a more complicated joint. We solved the problem by slightly changing positions of the fulcrums, dividing the four sticks into two groups to avoid concentration on a single point.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Piling up of small parts from the ground was highly developed in the traditional architecture of Japan and China. This time the method was greatly improved in combination with state-of-the art technology so that people are brought further into the architecture. It is a fluid, cave-like space.

Starbucks Coffee at Dazaifu Dazaifu Tenman-gū by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Location: 3-1196-11 Zaifu, Dazaifu, Fukuoka Prefecture
Client: Manten Corporation
Type of Construction: new construction
Purpose: coffee shop
Design and Supervision: Kengo Kuma & Associates
Structure: wood
Number of Stories: One story on the ground
Site Area: 436.71㎡
Built Area: 212.98㎡
Total Floor Area: 210.03㎡
Height of Ceiling: 1F: 4m
Maximum Height: 5.06m
Structure: Jun Sato Structural Engineering
Facility Design: Tosai Corporation, Kyu-den Ko Corporation
Construction: Matsumoto-gumi Corporation
Lighting: Isumi Okayasu Lighting Design
Design Period: 2011.1 - 2011.8

  • perpertualstudent

    Possibly the coolest starbucks ever!

  • CiTa

    cool…. but "eat & run baby" ??

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    Very nice.

    The tables look a bit like an after-thought, though.

  • mitch

    i really love it…but can't stop thinking that it's an enormous waste of wood!

    • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

      If the place is nice enough to compel costumers to visit it, then it wasn't a waste per se, for it fulfilled its purpose.

      Of course, I'm assuming the cost of the wood considered its renewability by taking the necessary re-foresting measures. Maybe that's not the case, but if that's so, then it is a problem that goes beyond this particular project.

  • efj

    Now this is a step in the right direction !

  • jason

    Possibly the coolest coffee shop ever!! ;)

  • eve

    great design… but i gotta say the only thing that makes me realize it's Starbucks is its signage… well just saying

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001538348169 Sooyun Jeong

    일본의 어느 스타벅스 by 쿠마 켄고(Kengo Kuma). 프랜차이즈 커피숍의 놀라운 변화. 가보고 싶군.

  • Dare

    It feels like piles of woods ready to fall-off on top of my head plus claustrophobic feel. And my first impression is : i don’t want to be the cleaning service on those woods. Talking about painstaking maintenance. BUT I WANT THOSE CHAIRS!!! :D

  • jxd

    "Structure: Wood" and, yet, the woven wood does not seem to be structural but is likely hanging off a a far simpler wooden frame in the walls. For me that is the problem with this project. It's more of an installation than architecture: a restrained copy of Arne Quinze.

  • Benben

    A stroke of genius on Starbucks' behalf… Kengo makes them look schmick!

  • https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=700686969 Danica Li

    改天去坐坐…

  • http://www.facebook.com/antpereira Antonio Rosa da Silva

    Starbuck doesnt deserve such fine architecture!!

  • http://designospire.com designospire.com

    Artistic beauty but a lot of maintanence work involved I guess. No denyimg it is a uniquely designed outlet. Like the way a small component is used to create dramatic effect but surely as Red Pill Junkie mentioned above enviornmental concerns?? Feels on the move with all the movement created with those wooden battons. Might feel a bit intimidating while sitting under the wood!

  • Patrick Tofts

    Pity the coffee isn't worth going in for

  • Deah

    In a coffee shop I want to relax and that fire hazard just does not do it for me. And i am with the guy that said it would be difficult to clean! It looks like it would be a great entrence to a childrens playground. Or maybe someone can suggest something else it would be appropriate for the public. Deah from Spain

  • anna

    I don't buy this waste of wood. It seems too much effort for an interior cladding that also needs a lot of maintenance. The space seems more intimidating than appealing. A stunt.

  • rich

    Designed so people don't use the internet too long!! I can't imagine staying in that space for more than a couple minutes….. AND it is impractical as mentioned above.

  • Lekha

    It keeps me the creeps… too claustrophobic.
    ..

  • tak007

    Making the process of cleaning one of the fundamental reasons not to like this design is simply ridiculous.

    Those critics are the same people asking for maintenance free gardens. Architecture which is handled without care will rot as everything else (even seemingly easy to clean buildings).

    Yes you have to maintain something to keep it beautiful!

    It is a lazy and pathetic, ignorant attitude which is actually causing most of our environmental problems nowadays.

    If somebody decides to go for such an interior design he will be well aware that
    somebody will have to clean the timber from time to time, meaning he likes the design enough to invest some money for maintenance.