Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma
and Associates

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Slideshow: this museum in Xinjin, China, by Japanese architects Kengo Kuma and Associates appears to be screened by rows of floating tiles.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The traditional local tiles are in fact stretched tautly around the building on wire strings, shading the glazed exterior from direct sunlight.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Located at the entrance to a holy Taoist site, the Xinjin Zhi Museum accommodates religious exhibitions within a continuous gallery that spirals up through three floors.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The building's staggered frame is constructed from concrete and angles in different directions to create a series of pointed edges and cantilevers.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Pools of water surround the museum, some of which are contained behind the tiled screens.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Other recent projects by Kengo Kuma and Associates include a ceramics showroom and a Starbucks coffee shop - see them both and more here.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Here's some more text from the architects:


Xinjin Zhi Museum

This pavilion is located at the foot of Laojunshan mountain in Xinjin, to usher in the people to the holy place of Taoism, while the building itself shows the essence of Taoism through its space and exhibitions.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The tile used for façade is made of local material and worked on in a traditional method of this region, to pay tribute to Taoism that emphasizes on nature and balance. Tile is hung and floated in the air by wire to be released from its weight (and gain lightness). Clad in breathing façade of particles, the architecture is merged into its surrounding nature.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The façade for the south is divided into top and bottom and staggered in different angles. This idea is to respond to two different levels of the pond in front and the street at the back, and avoid direct confrontation with the massive building in the south.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

For the east side, a large single tile screen is vertically twisted to correspond with the dynamism of the road in front. The façade for the north side is static and flat, which faces the pedestrians’ square. Thus the tile screen transforms itself from face to face, and wraps up the building like a single cloth.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Taking advantage of the varied levels in the architecture’s surroundings, the flow is planned to lead people from the front to the back, motion to stillness, like a stroll type of garden.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The exhibition space inside is planned spiral moving from darkness to light. From the upper floor a paramount view of Laoujunshan can be enjoyed. Direct sunlight is blocked by the tile, and the interior of the building is covered with gentle light with beautiful particle-like shade.

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Project name: Xinjin Zhi Museum
Client: Fantasia group

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Location: Cheng du, china
Principal use: Museum

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Site area: 2,580 sqm
Building Area: 787 sqm

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Total floor area: 2,353 sqm
Stories: 3 stories, 1 basement

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Design: Kengo Kuma & Associates
Structural engineers: Oak Structural Design Office

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Mechanical engineers: P.T.Morimura & Associates,LTD
Design period: 2008 October - 2009 December

Xinjin Zhi Museum by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Construction period: 2010 January - 2011 December
Structural: Reinforced concrete, partly steel flame

  • http://www.e-crm.co.uk Jim Bath

    Having lived in China and felt/heard the lingering animosity of the Chinese towards the Japanese, it's nice to see that they can get along! Not my favourite, though…

  • poi

    Beautiful.

  • http://cargocollective.com/arcalign ArcAlign

    Sexy stuff. I'm appreciating the tiled negligée…It's an original solution to applying an ambre solaire. Less skilful architects would have resorted to slapping on slats of wood on a steel frame.

  • http://www.injoyingjapan.com/blog injoyingjapan

    I personally prefer it by night. Good reflection of tiles on the water but… is it so empty? The museum, I mean