Hooke Park Big Shed by AA Design & Make

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Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

Students from London's Architectural Association have designed and built a faceted wooden workshop in the woods in Dorset, England.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

This structure, which was completed as part of the AA Design & Make programme, is based within the 350-acre Hooke Park forest owned by the school and will be used as an assembly and prototyping workshop by future students.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

The larch used to construct the building was sourced both from within the park and from local woodlands.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

A system of columns and trusses made from unmilled tree trunks comprise the building's structural framework.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

The project was overseen by course director Martin Self, as well as by British architect and tutor Piers Taylor.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

We previously featured a pod-shaped retreat that AA students completed in the same woodland - see it here or see more projects by AA students here.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

Photography is by Valerie Bennett.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

Here's a little more text from Piers Taylor:


A new workshop building designed by the Architectural Association Design and Make students, on which we are acting as executive architects.

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

The building is constructed using prototypical techniques developed through testing in the material science laboratory at Bath University and using material extracted from the Hooke woodland, which has been constructed by a team put together by Charley Brentnall.

 

Hooke Park Big Shed by Piers Taylor and AA

  • Edward

    Looks like a lovely creature… like it might crawl away in a big wind – like a theo jansen kinetic sculpture.. I hope it will accept visitors…

  • Matt

    Oh look, yet more ridiculous shape making from the AA…what a surprise.

    • lisa

      Are you really being serious? Want to quantify want you mean by ridiculous? Or a you a form follow function evangelical too…

      • mik

        Lisa, if ridiculous is measurable here then I would give you 8 points and 10 to the fabulous project.
        form function evangelical…wow. that was deep.

      • Matt

        Are you really being serious….? You say form follows function evangelical like its a bad thing. Maybe you should take a deeper look at your own design principles.

        • lisa

          Apologies for insinuating that the form follows function evangelical terminology is supposed to be something of deep philosophical consideration. It really isn't and I have no disagreement to the notion of form following function either. I only wanted to remind that it's (obviously) not the only point of departure in design and just because it's not, shouldn't be tagged as 'ridiculous'. I just can't find this design ridiculous. It seems well considered, elegant and an inspiring space for the kids out at Dorset to experiment and fabricate in. They have my thumbs up.

  • #1!

    Piers Taylor… what an odious, obnoxious and objectionable fellow he is. Each and every project he has ever done has forever been, and shall forever be, always about him. An egotistical, self-obsessed, self-aggrandising twat.

  • Laurs

    Stop the hate people! STUDENTS designed and built it! Get over yourselves!

  • james

    A real shame the AA is in such a a state!

  • some guy

    i have never posted a comment on the internet before but wtf people. look around at most new buildings. now look at this. it is fresh, concise, clever and it was built by students. when i was a student we built a house and it looked like, well, like students designed and built it. this thing is great and i am impressed with it.

  • CSpgs.

    @the haters: perhaps comments on dezeen that are merely empty attacks could be backed up by a link to a project designed by he/she who hurled the excrement. Architectural discourse might be more productive or enlightening if it is pursued in a conversation format based on mutual respect between people who share common interests. Constructive criticism, encouragement and suggestions are one nice way of bringing the discourse to an informative and exciting place. sometimes taking a shit might be fun and provoke conversation as well but if you want to say 'this sucks' please add a 'because', and make a good point. Otherwise stop wasting precious bits and bytes !

    …end of rant

    The fact that this is a student design and build project amazes me, it seems to be very well designed and constructed. I enjoy the geometrical playfullness, but I could be biased. It does raise questions about whether that was necessary seeing as how those awkward internal nooks are not 'functioning' other than what some may consider superficially at the moment. The material choices (raw timbers) must have forced the students into a painful and productive learning experience. The project certainly might have taken more advantage of, and been informed by the material properties but that may not have been appropriate in this case.. This also might have become more of a building for making buildings and about making buildings.

    Overall very impressive guys, congrats !

  • Nelly

    Its a workshop, a shed… that is the function. So a bit of leeway in terms of making the thing beautiful should be allowed! And it seems to be quirky, but appealing. Like the contrast between the smooth, formal outside and messy (meant as no critiscism), honest inside. That it is built by students should be no justification for any kind of soft treatment- this building is a lot better than many buildings posted on Dezeen.

  • mik

    what is that structure in the interior?
    I mean. architecture should be clear no?

  • David

    Perhaps would be good to see the original design team? Then also the construction team. Name by name. People should know their heroes.