Bøler Church by
Hansen/Bjørndal Architects

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This brick and copper church near Oslo by Norwegian studio Hansen/Bjørndal Architects has one end buried in a hillside and the other sticking in the air (+ slideshow).

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Above: photograph is by Nils Petter Dale

The architects won an international competition back in 2004 to design the new church for the parish of Bøler, a suburb to the south-east of the Norwegian capital.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Brick steeples mark the opposite corners of the church, one of which is also a bell-tower.

 Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

The copper-clad end facade projects forwards and upwards to give an angled wall and ceiling to the church hall contained on the first floor at one end.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Behind this hall, the building steps upward to wrap around a large entrance courtyard, while a congregation hall and chapel are housed on the opposite side.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

The dark brick walls are exposed inside the rooms of the building and the ceilings are wooden.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

This year we've also featured a concrete church in Tenerife and a faceted church hall in Austria.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

See more stories about churches on Dezeen »

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Photography is by Layla Meyrick/Velour, apart from where otherwise stated.

Here's some more information from Hansen/Bjørndal Architects:


Bøler church

The new Bøler church is the result of an open architectural competition in 2004.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Above: photograph is by Nils Petter Dale

The church stretches across a falling terrain, with the main functions either elevated on a plateau (church hall), on ground level (congregation hall) or dug into the ground (chapel).

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

A sheltering side wing of brick protects the functions from the traffic and the raised rail tracks to the east. The church patio is reached through a gateway, and opens up to the surrounding nature.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Above: photograph is by Nils Petter Dale

The main church hall is entered through an anteroom, and the ceiling lifts towards the far wall. The glazed areas of the sidewalls give glimpses of the nature outside and the shifting seasons.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Above: photograph is by Nils Petter Dale

The main spaces are oriented vertically and connected by a processional axis.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Above: photograph is by Nils Petter Dale

Administrative and support functions are located in the side wings.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Click above for larger image

There is a parish kindergarten and a youth club in the lower level.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

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The main roof structure is steel, supported by concrete columns and concealed by a timber ceiling inside, and copper cladding on the outside.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

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The side wings are load bearing brick carrying insitu concrete slabs. The flat roofs have a green sedum covering.

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Click above for larger image

Landscaping: Trifolia landskapsarkitekter
Art (fordelingshall): Barbro Raen Thomassen
Art (glass behind the alter): Thomas Hestvold
Concrete art (side alter): Benedikte Wedset

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Click above for larger image

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Click above for larger image

Boler Church by Hansen-Bjorndal Architects

Click above for larger image

  • LOW

    Scandinavian juiciness

  • Heeseo

    Obviously a Zumthor fan, copying elements and materials here and there :<

    • ale

      Well, that’s not so strange since Zumthor and his works and theories is very close to the theoretical work of Christian Norberg-Schulz (which incidentally also studied in Zürich) and the works of architects like Arne Korsmo. Swiss architecture in general and Zumthor in particular is usually considered to be very closely linked with Nordic architecture.

  • Mert

    The project doesn't seem tied together very well…each image could almost be of a different building. Perhaps the program was too expansive, or the architects were punching above their weight, but the building strikes me as a rather unpleasant place to look for god.

  • www

    I agree. The design is bristling with disparate elements.