Red House at Red Hill
by Inarc

| 7 comments
Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Millions of tiny perforations are dotted across the rusted steel walls of this rural retreat in Victoria by Melbourne architects Inarc.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Located on a hillside overlooking the bay, the weekend house has two floors nestled into the sloping landscape.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Rooms are arranged either side of a timber-lined corridor that spans the house, with bedrooms and living rooms positioned along the rear wall to give them views out towards the sea.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Earlier this year we rounded up all our stories about buildings with perforated metal facades. See them all here.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Other interesting Australian houses from the Dezeen archive include a residence with origami-like walls and a steel-plated bunker.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Photographs are by Peter Clarke.

See more stories about houses in Australia »

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

More text from Inarc can be found below:


Red House at Red Hill represents the adventurous spirit of the Australian weekender, albeit with a little more discreet comfort.

The building sits within a paddock defined by rows of pine windbreaks. The view is world class, serene and bucolic on the one hand yet ever changing when looking towards Port Philip bay and passing ships.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

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The Red House plan is a linear arrangement of spaces emanating radially a central hub. The long kinked and fragmented plan allows for a variety of daylight and views in every room.

The linear plan results in a long and low angular building form which is nestled into the contours of the hill. From a distance the rusted steel cladding appears solid, closer inspection reveals a transparent veil of perforations. The uniformity of the cladding and the jagged composition of walls and roof suggest house as sculpture, something timeless, non utilitarian and something which will preserve the excitement generated by this site.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Click above for larger image

Red Hill has become a rural and coastal retreat for Melbourne’s well heeled who wish to escape their urban existence. Increasingly big budget homes carry their urban sameness to the countryside and overwhelm the delicacy of experience to which the occupants retreat.

Red House demonstrates that the experience can be enjoyed and augmented in an artistic manner while at the same time satisfying the demand of modern housing must haves, a weekender that works.

Red House at Red Hill by Inarc

Click above for larger image

  • DMJ

    Dull.

    When I think what they could have put on that site.

    Sigh…

    • GAJ

      yes, but its an interesting approach to the site…how it uses the tones of the earth in the materiality and the form that subtly rise into a striking form. Monochromatic dullness which blends beautifully with its context; an interesting re-imagination of the australian country shed.

    • GAJ

      yes, but its an interesting approach to the site…how it uses the tones of the earth in the materiality and the form that subtly rise into a striking form. Monochromatic dullness which blends beautifully with its context

  • http://myveryowneyegoggles.blogspot.com.au/ Margie

    The exterior form of this house is striking, sculptural, and beautiful. What a shame the interiors don’t match this quality….

  • Buz

    And this place looks nice to live in because…? I thought the days of architects designs spaces for architects rather than for people had come and gone..?

  • Jackal

    It looks like the complex junctions have been well detailed and as a result the exterior is very successful, particularly the South-facing elevation. Also the Corten steel just works, which is not usually the case . It's the sort of project where I imagine the client is very satisfied. I do however also agree with Margie that the interior could be better. My main problem is the area at the top of the stair ( see image #5 ): in plan it actually looks more convincing, but in the image it is clearly quite uncomfortable to have so many different planes meeting in one place. All in all a very nice project though, respect to Inarc.

  • MBG

    This house looks like it was built by or for Richard Serra.