Unou house by
Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

| 11 comments
 

A tall and narrow entrance slopes down to a low and wide living space at this triangular house in Japan by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Located in Toyota in Aichi Prefecture, the black wooden house is arranged between two frames at either end, one vertical and the other horizontal.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The frames create a sloping roof and walls between them as the two-storey entrance diminishes to a single storey at the rear.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

A series of wooden frames have been arranged throughout the interior as freestanding doorways.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

At the lower end of the house is the main living area with full-length sliding windows looking out onto a train track.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The upper floor contains two bedrooms and loft space for another bed, as well as a terrace overlooking the entrance.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Other projects by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates we've featured on Dezeen include a house with sliding doors between each room and a house with a triangular facade.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

See more stories about Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates »

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Photographs are by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Here's some more text from the architects:


Project introduction:

Site: As the surrounding of a site, a residence stands in a row in the north-and-south side, and the east-and-west side is a place where a comparatively good field of view.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Frame (outside): For this site which has good view, we put two “frames”. One is vertical frame at east. The other is horizontal frame at west.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The space consists of connecting the two frames. It's a space horizontally opened while reducing height gradually and a space vertically opened while reducing a plan gradually. The “one room” is expanding vertically and horizontally.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

One room: I have an idea that the residence should be one room. However, the monotonous one room which can see the whole feels in many cases that there are few choices of an air and a life. So we have made “one room” which can connect family without seeing directly.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

We proposed preparing "the boundary of air” connecting good fields of view in the east-and-west and gaining depth and density to the space.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Frame (inside): Concretely, we use wooden frame which use auxiliary as window or door frame. We think wooden frame itself takes a part of specifying space boundary.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

It is distinguished as somewhere else at the same time the space before and behind that is connected because there is a wooden frame. It is constituted as space with moderate tolerance.

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Project details
Location: Toyota Aichi Japan
Site Area: 466.49m2
Built Area: 74.52m2
Total Floor Area: 83.48m2
Type of Construction: wooden
Exterior Materials: wooden boards + oil paint finish
Interior Materials: paint finish

House in Toyota Aichi by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates_

Design time: September 2010 - September 2011
Date of completion: July 2012
Design team: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
Structure company: Tatsumi Terado Structural Studio
Construction company: Toyonaka Construction Ltd

  • another architect

    Great house! But on the floor levels, that step from the kitchen to the lounge could be uncomfortable if you bring your food, dont you think? Cheers!

    • xtiaan

      It would depend on how much wine you’d consumed in the kitchen. But then again if you drink so much you couldn’t manage a single step from kitchen to lounge you are more likely to be sleeping in a railcar than the nice house by the railway lines.

  • http://www.laanpenge247.dk Lån Penge

    The Japanese always manage to impress! Though actually that building – from the outside – in some ways looks like some of the more modern churches we have in Denmark… which is pretty weird to be honest!

  • Qubes

    Look up “Aluminium Cottage” by Toyo Ito – deja vu?

  • xtiaan

    Walking through bedroom #1 to get to bedroom #2 seems like it would be both a drag and a hassle.

    The form of the building is inspired though.

  • workley

    Sorry but I do not like it. The triangle shape makes me uncomfortable, and why would you constrain yourself with these wedge walls with no windows? The funnel and accenting the front entry is great idea, but only in idea of focusing the front entry door as an element. The inside space is then funneled to a view of the rail road. Why? The shape will echo the sound throughout the entire space.

    The site does not look constrained so why is the shape a triangle? Why? Other than an art piece – yes – it is good in theory, but again misses the mark for its users and function. Sorry this is not for me.

    Great that you got a client to buy into the idea. Probably more site modeling would have rendered a better use of the spaces and site, but it looks cool from the train.

  • Concerned Citizen

    True to form, this house shows no respect to life safety. Couple that with an express view of a railroad, and one wonders why?

  • Xtal

    Trainspotter central? You'd have to really, really like trains to live there and perhaps not have any pets nor small children being so close to the tracks (and instant death). But a very nice house nonetheless.

  • Esbee

    Triangles and wedges instantly conjured up memories of Wright’s Price Tower. Guess that dates me! But this plan lacks the elegance of geometry, design finesse and contextual moorings of Wright’s designs. The finish is great so it will be special to see and live in, even if the feel is institutional rather than residential. Certainly out of the ordinary and mundane.

  • train

    If you look at the rust on the top of the rails, that means abandoned tracks > no train > nice landscape.

  • sex

    A lot of Japanese houses featured on architecture/design websites seem a bit dangerous and have separate bedrooms that are almost one room or require walking through one room to get to another. Maybe I am a bit perverted, but this always make me think of privacy and sex.

    Teenagers would never feel comfortable masturbating in their bedrooms and parents would not be able to have sex if anyone else was in the house. Or maybe people with open concept plans and adjoining bedrooms are more open and comfortable with these things? Does anyone else ever think about this?