Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden
by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

| 11 comments
 

Steel trees with sprawling branches support the glass roof of this greenhouse in Switzerland by Buehrer Wuest Architekten (+ slideshow).

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Located in a botanical garden outside the village of Grüningen, the greenhouse is used for growing subtropical plants such as banana and papaya.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

The architects borrowed structural patterns found in nature, like the membranes of a leaf, to create the geometric structure of the roof.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Glass screens subdivide the space to create different planting areas.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Other greenhouses we've featured include one made from Lego and another with a temporary restaurant inside.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Photography is by Markus Bertschi.

Here are a few words from the architects:


The new pavilion at the botanical garden at Grueningen relates strongly to its context. The design was inspired by the surrounding forest, not the built environment.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Both the formal vocabulary and the structural concept derive from nature. The pavilion is conceived to harmonize with and expand the forest.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Site plan - click above for larger image

The form was developed using Voronoi tessellation, also known as natural neighbor interpolation. Analogous to cell division in nature, the geometry of the roof as surrounding membrane was determined by the position of the old and new trunks.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Column plan detail - click above for larger image

The forest was augmented by four steel trees that form the primary structural system of the pavilion.

Greenhouse at Grüningen Botanical Garden by Buehrer Wuest Architekten

Column detail - click above for larger image

At about five meters, the trunks branch toward the treetop, which forms the natural roof. A secondary glass construction, suspended from the steel branches, encloses the inner space of the greenhouse.

  • JeffK

    Breathtakingly beautiful.

  • Donkey

    Now that IS nice.

  • tak

    Sorry guys but our office came up with that idea first. http://www.dezeen.com/2011/06/08/tree-restaurant-… Just be real.

    • Waney Edge

      To quote a FAT dude, "It's not what you steal, it's the way that you steal it".

    • jed

      The restaurant uses that form for for admittedly beautiful decorative effect, whereas this is structurally very integrated.

      Also, other than on the most superficial level, these designs aren’t even that similar.

    • joh

      Jed is correct. And it’s not the best idea to point out to the world when someone does something similar but better than “you”. Just appreciate it and glean what insight you can.

    • Just be real.

      http://www.shigerubanarchitects.com/SBA_WORKS/SBA

      Did they steal your idea too, Tak? if so, you should hire them to take your ideas and make them infinitesimally more sophisticated.

  • chris

    Tak, I hope youre joking with that comment about having that idea first: http://www.nadaaa.com/#/projects/banq/

  • Kyle

    Finally a greenhouse that does not look like it came from the 19th century.

  • Romain

    The “execution schematics” are a godsend, thank you Dezeen!

  • Peter Müller

    Tak, I think you should have paid a little attention when listening to the architecture history lectures. The idea is much older and you can find the core of this concept in late gothic vaults. Anyhow: there is nothing wrong with finding a motive in the history of architecture. But it is pitiful if you use it as an interior design instead of a structure and are not even able to realise your own adaptation and the step forward which Buehrer Wüst did.