Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum
by C. F. Møller Architects

| 6 comments
 

Danish firm C.F. Møller likens its completed art and craft museum in Norway to a "block of ice that has slid down from the surrounding mountains" (+ slideshow).

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

The Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum is located within the small town of Førde, which sits on the edge of the Jostedalsbreen glacier, the largest body of ice in continental Europe.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

The architects referenced this by using frosted glass and illuminated fracture lines to create a glacial facade around the four-storey building.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

A bright blue staircase spirals up though the museum to lead visitors to galleries on each of the floors.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

A roof terrace is screened behind the parapet walls and offers a view towards the mountains.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

See more stories about museums here, including one shaped like a kitchen sink that we featured recently.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

See more stories about C.F. Møller »

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

Here's some extra details from C.F. Møller:


Sogn & Fjordane Art Museum

The small Norwegian town of Førde draws its qualities from its interaction with the surrounding mountains, which are visible everywhere, and from Jostedalsbreen, the largest glacier on the European mainland, which lies in close proximity to the town.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

The town's new museum, Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum also draws upon the distinctive landscape for its architectural expression: the museum lies like a crystal-clear block of ice that has slid down from the surrounding mountains.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

The crystalline form provides an asymmetrical plan solution, with varying displacements in the facade. The facade is clad in white glass with a network of angled lines, reminiscent of the fracture lines in ice. This network also defines the irregular window apertures. In the evening these lines are illuminated, so that the museum lies like a sparkling block in the middle of the town’s darkness.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

Inside, visitors move upwards through the museum's four floors of exhibition space, and at the top a panoramic view of the mountains can be enjoyed from a roof terrace that can also function as an exhibition space or stage.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

C.F. Møller Architects were also responsible for the design of the SEIF office building which is the museum’s closest neighbour, and for a residential complex on the same site which is presently under construction.

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

Client: Sogn & Fjordane, Futurum AS
Address: Førde, Norway
Architect: C.F. Møller Architects
Construction: Åsen & Øvrelid
Landscape: Schønherr Landskab
Engineers: Hjellnes Consult, Sweco AS, Nord Vest Miljø AS

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

Size: 3,000 m2
Construction: 2010-2012
Prizes: 1st Prize in architectural competition, 2006

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

Floor plans - click above for larger image and key

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

Section - click above for larger image

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

East elevation - click above for larger image

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

North elevation - click above for larger image

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

West elevation - click above for larger image

Sogn & Fjordane Kunstmuseum by C.F. Møller Architects

South elevation - click above for larger image

  • Peter

    For a museum that deals with craft there doesn't seem to be a love of craft in it. The over finessing of the facade is pretty disappointing in comparison to the detailing and qualities of the internal space. Otherwise pretty pictures.

  • http://squawktalk.tumblr.com Jes

    Likened to a “block of ice that has slid down from the surrounding mountains”

    …but really more like a glass cube covered in halogen tube lights.

  • cethuesen

    I wonder how that thing will look in 10 years…

  • Raymond

    Rings a bell. Erick van Egeraat's Vershina project in Surgut: http://www.archdaily.com/182782/vershina-trade-an

  • choppedsuey

    C.F. Møller taking mountain metaphor/cliches to a new level while setting a new record for lack of convergence between text and reality at the same time.

  • Anfal

    This is exactly what architects try to do when they have a simple box design, but they want to attract people: a random facade with high costs that reflect the complexity! I think they would come up with a better look if they applied “simplicity is complexity”.