Nonsystem
by Su Jung-Cheng

| 5 comments
 

ECAL graduate Su Jung-Cheng has designed a collection of boxes and flat surfaces that clip together to make stools, shelves or whatever's needed at the time.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

The Nonsystem collection comprises five elements in different materials that can be fixed to each other using small red tabs.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

Su Jung-Cheng came up with the design after thinking about how homeless people build beds and furniture from boxes and pieces of cardboard.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

The red box and the black frame are made from aluminium and the crate is made from maple, while the two flat surface pieces are made of Plexiglas and recycled plastic.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

The pieces are designed to be multi-functional, says the designer. "For example, a box is the minimal element for storage, but if you turn the box it could also serve as a stool," she told Dezeen.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

"I chose not to define much about the function so that you can always leave it open to any kind of function," she added.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

The design is currently a prototype but Jung-Cheng hopes to put it into production soon.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

Jung-Cheng completed her bachelor's degree in Taiwan before graduating from the Product Design master's course at Ecole Cantonale d’art de Lausanne (ECAL) in Switzerland this year, where Nonsystem was her final project.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

Other adaptable furniture we've featured on Dezeen includes a set of chairs that can be swapped around in their bathtub-shaped base and a storage design that uses sliding rods for its shelves.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

See all our stories about storage »
See all our stories furniture »

Here's some more information from the designer:


Nonsystem is a system furniture or not a system furniture.

It was inspired by an image that shows a homeless person building his bed with two storage boxes and chipboard. I was very fascinated by this minimalist style. So I created this boxes furniture collection to cope with all changes by remaining unchanged.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

This transforming furniture system consists of five various elements that can be adjusted to a user's needs. Made from aluminum, maple wood, Plexiglas and recycled plastic, the collection can be playfully mixed and matched.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

It is a research of function and material. While designing these boxes, I learned to treat different materials in different ways.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

The final result gives a look almost like a collage of materials and colors. And what makes them look coherent is only by their dimension. So each piece can be regard as an individual object but also part of the system.

Nonsystem by Su Jung-Cheng

"Random is measurable"
"La mathematique est l'art de donner le meme nom a des choses differentes."
(Mathematics is the art of giving the same name to different things.)
Henri Poincare

  • M J

    Useless furniture, I might as well pile garbage in my living room!

    • Andy

      I like the Mickey Mouse though.

    • Calen

      Where do you live?! I’ll come pick up the beautiful, finely-crafted garbage that must litter your neighborhood. All I have in my alley is wet cardboard and dirty junk. Must be nice. I’m guessing Dubai?

  • Mich

    I think this is a really nice example of a perfect associations of different shapes, materials, textures, colors and really shows a continuity of some, maybe I dare say, Memphis design, in a more contemporary way.

    The intelligence of those small red dots, used as piece for combining the different boxes gives a strong identity and character to the project. Sad that some people just can’t understand and get some nice and small intervention like this one.

  • Virginia

    I like the association of different types of materials / colours too.