Job Office collection by Studio Job
for Lensvelt

| 11 comments
 

Milan 2013: Belgian artists Studio Job will present a desk with a golden nose for a drawer handle as part of a collection for Dutch furniture brand Lensvelt at MOST in Milan this week.

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

Above: Job Buffet

Another piece in the Job Office collection for Lensvelt is the Job Buffet, a white powder-coated metal cabinet with two doors and a chrome-plated aluminium key that locks it.

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

The Job Desk also makes use of white powder-coated metal for its top and legs, but instead of a key to open the slim drawer, the user must pull on the golden nose.

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

Above: Job Desk

The two Job Tables are enlarged versions of the Job Desk.

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

Above: gold nose drawer handles

The Job Desk Lamp uses LED bulbs and features an oversized golden switch under its powder-coated metal shade.

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

Above: Job Desk Lamp

Each piece in the collection is available in a range of colours: white, green, grey, dark grey, black, red, yellow and blue.

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

Above: Job Cabinet

"Over time, Hans Lensvelt has proven to be an ingenious product developer who consistently transforms our unconventional designs into comprehensive functional products, yet intricately maintaining a sense of wit," said designer Job Smeets. "Our collaboration constitutes sustainable office furniture, valuing the importance of functionality and high-quality objects that represent their own identity and humour."

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

The collection is an extension of the Job Cabinet launched by Studio Job in Milan last year – a metal cabinet with a single door that also comes with a gold-coloured key.

Job Office by Studio Job for Lensvelt

Above: installation of the collection in Milan

These pieces will be on show at the MOST exhibition in Milan from 9 to 14 April, while Studio Job will also show lamps with metal buckets and tubs for shades as part of Moooi's latest collection – see all design by Studio Job.

This week we're covering all the highlights from Milan, including Zaha Hadid's monochrome pendant lamps for Slamp and OMA's furniture collection for US brand Knoll – see all news and products from Milan 2013 or take a look at our interactive map featuring the week's best exhibitions, parties and talks.

Photographs are by Roos Aldershoff.

  • deedee

    What’s next? A “pull my finger” desk chair? At least the Job Cabinet was poetic, the nose stuff is becoming a bit silly and meaningless.

  • alex

    I am often labelled as childish when I anthropomorphise everyday objects, but furniture with facial features is such a subjective area it’s hard to even consider a rational debate about it. Either we like it, think it’s kitsch, or hate it.

  • consuehlo

    A must-have for avid fans of Gogol’s or Shostakovich’s “The Nose”.

  • Michael

    Very nice surrealism that nose! Also a strong and fun campaign with icons leading up to this launch.

  • ORSO

    I don’t think they really care what you think.

  • Tim

    Fun follow-up of to Job Cabinet! Nice to see some humour back in design.

  • Greg

    Is this for the pun “nose job”?

  • academic one

    I got a grin. As a child, how many times have you picked your nose? Now you can stick your finger in every time you open a drawer.

    I already see an office prank of someone sticking some chewed gum in the opening. Would have love to have seen an entire chest of drawers with two pulls per drawer. Let me know when I can get them so I can put them on my kitchen cabinets.

    @Deedee, your pull my finger idea may have legs. How about as a toilet handle? :-)

  • MD D/P

    Why do people do these things?

  • http://www.calibre-furniture.co.uk/ office furniture

    Drawer handles in the shape of noses? We’ll see them getting sold in a well-known Swedish flat-pack furniture store before long.

  • http://fastofficefurniture.net.au Ali Raza

    I anthropomorphise everyday objects, but furniture with facial features is such a subjective area it's hard to even consider a rational debate about it. Either we like it, think it's kitsch, or hate it.