Park House by
Another Apartment

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Japanese studio Another Apartment has completed a house with an asymmetric roof on a narrow site in suburban Tokyo.

Park House by Another Apartment

Constructed across the street from a local park, the three-storey house has a glazed facade intended to offer views out towards the trees.

Park House by Another Apartment

"I started to think about creating a comfortable space where the attraction of park extends in," says architect Tsuyoshi Kobayashi of Another Apartment.

Park House by Another Apartment

A garage and bathroom take up most of the ground floor of Park House, so the architect located the living room and bedroom on the middle storey then added a mezzanine loft beneath the angled roof.

Park House by Another Apartment

A ladder connects the two upper floors, while wooden staircase treads lead up from the ground floor, beginning with a chunky triangular block.

Park House by Another Apartment

"With a light impression, the stairs look like thin plates appearing from the wall," says Kobayashi.

Park House by Another Apartment

Galvanised steel panels clad the exterior of the house and fold up over the roof.

Park House by Another Apartment

Other Japanese houses featured on Dezeen recently include a residence where rooms spiral up to a rooftop terrace and a weekend retreat with windows of various shapes and sizes.

Park House by Another Apartment

See more Japanese houses »

Park House by Another Apartment

Photography is by Koichi Torimura.

Park House by Another Apartment

Park House by Another Apartment
Ground floor plan - click for larger image
Park House by Another Apartment
First floor plan - click for larger image
Park House by Another Apartment
Second floor plan - click for larger image
Park House by Another Apartment
Cross section - click for larger image
  • Jason

    Nice but what is it with these over exaggerated roof angles in Japan that make upper spaces (or even whole rooms) unusable?

  • Don

    Fifth picture: in order to use the ladder one has to move it right to the stairs, and so when you climb to that mezzanine, you’re actually over the stairs leading to ground floor, some 4 to 4.5 metres? Too scary for me.

    The building looks cool, but not cool enough to get over details like I’ve mentioned.

  • Hanna

    In many cases in Tokyo, there are site restrictions that limit the height of the roof according to the amount of sunlight the plot next to it will receive. Given that this is in Tokyo where space is extremely limited, I’m assuming that the architect here maximised the height of the house to fit the site requirements leading to an oddly shaped exterior (and interior).