Photos of Sou Fujimoto's
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion

| 11 comments
 

Here's a full set of images from this year's Serpentine Gallery Pavilion by Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto (+ slideshow).

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

Unveiled this morning, Sou Fujimoto's design features a cloud-shaped grid of steel poles with varying density.

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

The sticks part to form two doorways and visitors can climb up onto transparent ledges within the structure.

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

They can also sit at cafe tables and chairs underneath, sheltered from above by a layer of transparent plastic discs.

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

The pavilion will open to the public from Saturday and remain in front of the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens until 20 October 2013.

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

Dezeen published the first photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 from the press preview this morning, where Fujimoto explained how he wanted to "create a nice mixture of nature and architecture," adding "that has been the great interest for me these last ten years."

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

See more architecture by Sou Fujimoto on Dezeen, including a house that looks like scaffolding and a library with shelves on the outside.

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

The annual unpaid Serpentine Gallery Pavilion commission is one of the highlights in world architecture and goes to a high-profile architect who has not yet built in the UK. At 41, Fujimoto is the youngest to have accepted the invitation.

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

Past commissions include Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei, Peter Zumthor, Jean Nouvel, SANAA and Frank Gehry.

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

See our handy guide to all the Serpentine Gallery Pavilions »
Watch our interviews with Herzog & de Meuron at last year's opening »
Watch our interview with Peter Zumthor in 2011 »

Photos of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 by Sou Fujimoto

Photographs are by Jim Stephenson.

  • Matt
    • http://www.ksld.com Claire Hope

      It does indeed.

    • L.A.

      Indeed!

  • Mick

    I start to hate this non-architecture. Japan is a fantastic country, but for ten years they’ve been promoting this nonsense. What is the point? Are a few sticks and two white chairs enough for an architectural content? WORST PAVILION EVER.

  • Nikola

    It’s done much better in other projects that have real innovation. For example, the Chidori series of Kengo Kuma: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.3434232

  • max

    After his unpaid architecture internships interview it’s too hard to take Sou’s architecture seriously : (

  • Airborne

    Agree with the above comments. The implementation of his form language (he likes clouds) into reality is disappointing and far from practical. I recall his house that’s made of beams which is open to the elements and where one has to climb to every usable space. Is he aiming at an evolution reversal where we have to develop ape-like skills?

  • http://www.geraldpeake.com Gerald Peake

    So one way to get past health and safety is to call it a pavilion? Like the Corbusier followers of the Sixties, Fujimoto makes no concessions for the British weather, or indeed the need to spend a penny!

  • Adrian

    This one might have drawn its inspiration from Minecraft.

  • …grippo

    So much for handicapped access!

  • Tachybaptus

    Have any of the hostile commenters actually been into this pavilion? Well, I have, and it’s an exhilarating place to be in. Remember that it is in a park, surrounded by grass and trees, so the fact that it has no real border allows you to feel still in the park when you are inside.

    It is a temporary summer pavilion and is not meant as a real shelter, but it does keep the rain off by means of an almost invisible network of sloping glass discs. Visitors love climbing on its levels, which have been carefully arranged so that you are obliged to stay on the glass-floored terraces and can’t wander off up the ironwork.

    There is a notice saying that you climb at your own risk, which is all that is needed. And as for disabled access, I took my disabled girlfriend into it in a wheelchair and there were no problems at all. Not up the terraces, of course. I have been in all the Serpentine pavilions, and I think this one is the best yet, even better than Toyo Ito’s puzzle cube. Both were light, white and joyous.

    Oh yes, and which was the worst? Ai Weiwei’s dismal cellar of 2012: who wants to be underground in a beautiful green place?