Summerhouse Lagnö by
Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

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A row of raw concrete gables give a zig-zagging profile to this summer house by Swedish studio Tham & Videgård Arkitekter on an island in the Stockholm archipelago (+ slideshow).

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Oriented towards the bay, the wide and shallow house was designed by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter to stretch across its site like a line of boathouses, creating five pitched rooftops with varying proportions.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

One of the middle gables comprises a glass canopy, sheltering a terrace that splits the building into two separate volumes. This space functions as the houses's entrance and offers an aperture from the edge of the forest towards the seafront.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Rather than following the timber-clad aesthetic shared by many of the archipelago's houses, architects Bolle Tham and Martin Videgård chose a plain concrete construction with seamless eaves and minimal detailing.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

"The client's desire for a maintenance-free house inspired us to search for a way to design the house as an integral part of nature, where the material's weight and colour scale connects to the archipelago granite bedrock, rather than a light wooden cottage," they explained.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

The concrete was cast against plywood boards, giving a subtle grain texture to the surface. This is complemented by ash window frames and wooden furniture.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

The largest of the two volumes accommodates a living and dining room that spans three of the gables.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Wooden doors slide open to reveal additional rooms behind, including three bedrooms, a bathroom and a kitchen. Ceilings inside some of the rooms are shaped into gables, extended from the main roofline, and many feature opening skylights.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

The smaller second volumes contains a guest bedroom and bathroom, with an outdoor swimming pool just beyond. There's also a concrete sauna located closer to the coastline.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Tham & Videgård Arkitekter is based in Stockholm. Other residences completed by the studio include an apartment with a colour scheme based on changing seasons and a hotel suite inside a mirror-clad treehouse.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

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Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Photography is by Åke E:son Lindman.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Here's a project description from Tham & Videgård Arkitekter:


Summerhouse Lagnö

The setting is the Stockholm archipelago, natural ground sloping gently down to the sea in the south, mostly open with a few trees and bushes. Unlike other projects we worked on located on more isolated islands in the archipelago without car access from the mainland, this site was relatively easy to reach also with heavy transports. This, together with the client's desire for a maintenance-free house inspired us to search for a way to design the house as an integral part of nature, where the material's weight and colour scale connects to the archipelago granite bedrock, rather than a light wooden cottage. The two building volumes are placed side by side and form a line that clarifies their position in the landscape, just at the border where the forest opens up out onto the bay. When approached from the north, the entrance presents itself as an opening between the buildings giving direction towards the light and water. It is a first outdoor space protected from rain by a pitched canopy of glass.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

The exterior character of the house is derived from a number of transverse gable roofs, which connect to each other, and like boathouses in a line form a pleated long facade. This provides a sequence of varied room heights for the interior and create places in the otherwise completely open living room that stretches through the entire length of the main building. With a relatively shallow room depth and a continuous sliding glass partition out to the terrace, the space can be described as a niche in relation to the archipelago landscape outside. The small rooms are located along the north façade with access through a wall of sliding doors. They are lit by openable skylights and form smaller pitched ceiling spaces within the main roof volume.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Terrace, interior floors and facades are made of exposed natural coloured in situ cast concrete with plywood formwork. The interior is painted white with woodworks in ash. A sauna, a detached block of in situ cast concrete with a wooden interior, offers a secluded place near the beach and pier.

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
Site plan - click for larger image

Architects: Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
Team: Bolle Tham and Martin Videgård, (chief architects), Anna Jacobson (project architect)
Interior: Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
Landscape design: Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
Structural engineer: Sweco, Mathias Karlsson
Built area: 140 sqm
Project: 2010
Completion: 2012

Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
Floor plan - click for larger image
Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
Long sections - click for larger image
Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
South elevation - click for larger image
Summerhouse Lagnö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
North elevation - click for larger image
  • http://www.aurelia-m.com aurelia-m

    I like the outside architecture a lot.

  • endeshavdz

    This could be a really good project if the glass canopy was designed differently in my opinion. I think this in an example where it looked good on the drawings, but didn’t quite work out in real life.

  • buildingahillsidehome

    I really like the beautiful section resonating inside, nice work.

  • Jonathan

    It looks like a death camp.

    • janine

      Really? Do you actually have any idea what you are talking about or are you just been offensive to both the architects, and victims of actual death camps?

      • Jonathan

        I have a reasonable idea of what I’m talking about. To me it looks cold, inhuman, and bleak. Photographs 1, 3, and 4 bring to mind the style of buildings I’ve seen in photographs of concentration camps.

        That’s what I felt when I saw them. That was the association they brought me. To suggest I was intentionally being offensive to holocaust survivors on the back of that is frankly appalling. Nor was I trying to be intentionally offensive to the architects. I was being honest in my response to their work. No doubt they wouldn’t like or agree with my response, but that’s another matter.

      • Gary Walmsley

        I agree with Johnathan, and frankly who cares about offending these creative deficient architects. P.S. Johnathan in no way said anything offensive about death camp victims. Spare us your histrionics.

    • Sam

      I highly doubt that there are any death camps that look like this.

    • alex

      It looks like the kind of place that would change your mind.

    • Allan

      There could be formal similarity between them, it depends on the viewers experience.

    • seebear

      Yes I agree. If you want to go with pitch roof, check out Go Hasegawa’s house.

  • Greg

    I like the way the design and materials compliment the landscape (mountains and stone) on the outside and the warmth with wood inside.

    Good usable space and nice light with the glass. I love the symmetry and balance, even though that’s not always mandatory with me for great design.

    I can only imagine that as the exterior concrete surface material changes from the effects of the weather and nature, it will blend well and look even better!

    • Gary Walmsley

      Greg, these flat, grey and stained concrete slabs are pathetic substitutes for stone.

  • jmg

    The concrete gables are fine on the entrance facade, but why these heavy gables over a wall of glass on the lake side? It does look oppressive to me. Not necessarily low-maintenance either.

  • http://www.actionext.com/playlist_57486.html La Milicia Negra

    Does anyone know what the name/brand of the Wegner look-a-like chairs is?

  • Gary Walmsley

    Yet more flat, grey and stained concrete slabs—this the best the creative team of Tham & Videgård Arkitekter could come up with?