Heydar Aliyev Center by Zaha Hadid
photographed by Hélène Binet

| 13 comments
 

Here's a set of images by photographer Hélène Binet showing Zaha Hadid's recently completed Heyder Aliyev Center that rises from the surface of a plaza in Baku, Azerbaijan (+ slideshow).

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

London-based architectural photographer Hélène Binet captured the interior and exterior of the cultural centre, which was designed by Zaha Hadid Architects as the main venue for exhibitions, concerts and other cultural activities in the capital city.

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

The 57,000-square-metre building was conceived as a fluid structure emerging from the ground as folded, undulating ribbons that form a continuous surface and wrap over glazed facades.

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

Clad with thousands of glass fibre reinforced concrete tiles, the building was designed to be a "celebration of traditional Azeri culture."

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

"One of the most critical yet challenging elements of the project was the architectural development of the building's skin," said the architects.

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

The interior features a library, large auditorium, conference centre and meeting rooms.

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

The structure combines concrete with a steel space frame, with all vertical columns hidden beneath the swooping, folding shell.

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

Light from the interior spills out over the outer surfaces at knight through gaps in the folds of the exterior.

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

The building was nominated for awards at both this year's World Architecture Festival and the biennial Inside Festival.

Heydar Aliyev Centre by Zaha Hadid photographed by Hélène Binet

  • JJK

    Melty blob, congrats.

  • Colonel Pancake

    I’d like to hate it but I don’t. I guess that’s a victory for her.

    • Steeevyo

      “Zaha Hadid is known for creating some of the most f***able architecture out there”
      Jon Stewart, Daily Show, Nov. 20th 2013

      • fawnster

        Funniest summary of her architecture and yet he explains it (although simplistically) to the general public in a segment only a few minutes long. I think he did a good job.

  • AJ

    *night instead of knight.

  • JK

    Shouldn’t it be mentioned here that Hélène Binet practices analog photography?

  • Gavin

    My exact same thought. I’ve grown so used to hating her work. It’s nice to see one I like. I’m comforted that I’m not just viewing her work through s**t-tinted glasses.

  • http://andrewprokos.com/ Andrew Prokos Photography

    Stunning architecture! The auditorium interior in particular is very interesting. The daytime exterior shots look underexposed though.

  • Laurent

    I hate Zaha but this time it’s quite eye pleasing I must admit.

  • zee

    A few haters have commented, the rest gave up.

  • Karen Johnston Dandewich

    Absolutely gorgeous. I’m grateful that Zaha Hadid is designing buildings that are both innovative and beautiful. The misogyny in this world is disgusting.

  • arriven

    You armchair architects certainly are a cranky bunch. I’ve only been reading Dezeen for about a month and for every positive comment I read there’s at least 20 “OMG I must gouge my eyes out with a rusty spoon and slay their first son for subjecting my prestigious taste to this fecal excrement of design.”

    As if architecture is the sole purpose of life and should be of the top-most priority for every individual in the world and nothing else can rival it. The stereotype that architects are a bunch of arrogant pessimists really isn’t far off, even in my school they get a rep as selfish and concerned only for their designs and theirs only. Quite frankly I really enjoyed this building and it’s probably breathtaking to see in person.

    I generally like rectilinear forms, but these curves are just the right in number and severity before turning into something grotesque. Zaha certainly has a distinct style, which whether you like it or not it’s impressive that she can make something that’s instantly distinguishable as hers (and I looked her up, and nothing screams “HATE ME”)

  • http://www.andy-matthews.co.uk/ Andy Matthews

    Incredible photos from Binet as usual. Top class.