Rusty steel tower over Roman ruins
by Marte.Marte Architects

| 6 comments
 

This rusty metal tower was designed by Austrian studio Marte.Marte Architects to help tourists locate excavated Roman ruins on the outskirts of a town in western Austria (+ slideshow).

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

Stefan Marte of Marte.Marte Architects created the structure between the remains of two Roman villas at the location of an ancient traffic intersection in Brederis. Few traces of the original buildings remain, so the new installation provides the only landmark above ground level.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

"The tower-like sculpture is designed to make the excavation site visible for miles around," Marte told Dezeen.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

Primarily constructed from Corten steel, the ten-metre tower has a glazed lower section that exposes a hollow centre, allowing visitors to look down to the underground remains.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

"The tower acts like a magnifying glass, offering an insight into history," said the architect, whose previous projects include a holiday home with roughly hewn concrete walls and a twisted concrete bridge.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

A platform extends from one side of the structure to create a standing area, while an adjacent wall displays replicas of Roman objects. Both were also constructed from pre-weathered steel that has been riveted together.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

"Corten steel was chosen for its naturalness and purity, making it the ideal material for an expressive landmark in the vast, open landscape," added Marte.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

"The texture of the stainless steel rivets is reminiscent of the intricacy of Roman chain armour."

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

Stones unearthed during the archeological dig were used to build low walls above the ancient foundations of the two villas, revealing the original locations of walls.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

Photography is by Marc Lins.

Here's a short project description from Marte.Marte Architects:


Roman Villa, Feldkirch 2008

The excavations at the roman villa in Brederis offer important insights on Roman settlement history in the Feldkirch area.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

A walk-in sculpture was planted between the remnants of the foundations of two different house types. The disc-like tower and the space creating wall fragments along a trapezoid-shaped plateau stage the location in front of the collection of findings.

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria

The use of Corten steel throughout permeates the site with an historic aura and underscores the sculpted effect of the free form that helps make the excavation site a landmark.

Floor plan of Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria
Floor plan - click for larger image

Client: City of Rankweil
Location: 6830 Rankweil-Brederis

Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria
Section - click for larger image

Architecture: Marte.Marte Architekten ZT GmbH, Weiler
Arch.DI Bernhard Marte
Arch.DI Stefan Marte
Exhibition area: 42m2

Elevations of Rusty steel tower by Marte.Marte Architects frames Roman ruins in Austria
Elevations - click for larger image
  • Cherif

    The stand-alone wall being too short and patterned killed what could have been one beautiful architectural project.

  • Nicolai Lilja

    It looks a bit like an extruded version of this project by Erik Nobel: http://www.nobel.dk/nav.php/projekter/4/648/1

  • Dezy_Chris

    That tower looks older than those ‘ruins’!

  • Chris MacDonald

    Beautiful, obelisk like. I do have a penchant for Cor-Ten steel though.

  • Guy Dudebro

    I don’t get it. You took natural areas and ancient ruins, and put a rusted metal cube on top of it?
    This smacks of an architect who is out of touch with the actual people who will go to visit these sites! What a waste…

  • Concerned Citizen

    “The texture of the stainless steel rivets is reminiscent of the intricacy of Roman chain armour.”

    That statement appears to be more rationalisation than fact.