Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects
extends a Sydney residence

| 10 comments
 

Chunky concrete slabs alternate with deeply recessed windows on the exterior of this Sydney house extension by Australian firm Nobbs Radford Architects (+ slideshow).

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

Named Glebe House, the two-storey annex was designed by Nobbs Radford Architects to provide the family residence with a new open-plan living and dining space, as well as extra bedroom and bathroom spaces.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

The structure is located at the rear of the existing property, creating a new elevation facing the garden. Doors and windows are set right back from the facade, creating the illusion that walls are almost a metre thick.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

"The depth of the rear facade creates an interstitial threshold, which is a space in itself to be occupied and provides a sense of enclosure," said studio founders Alison Nobbs and Sean Radford.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

Bare concrete surfaces continue into the interior, but are contrasted with warmer elements that include oak furniture and joinery, as well as pine floors.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

A double-height space sits behind the facade, while a series of alcoves are created by the stepped arrangement of the walls.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

"The project is primarily focused on the interconnections of cloistered spaces and selected framed openings," said the architects.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

The ground floor space is left open-plan. A breakfast counter divides the kitchen from the lounge area, while a family dining table fits into a space at the rear.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

A wooden staircase with shelves slotted into the sides of its treads leads upstairs, arriving at a mezzanine study that overlooks the room below.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

A new bedroom is tucked away on one side and opens out to a rooftop balcony.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

Photography is by Murray Fredericks.

Here's a project description from Nobbs Radford Architects:


Glebe House - a family home in Sydney, Australia

The project is primarily focused on the interconnections of cloistered spaces and selected framed openings. The outer concrete elements contrast with the timber elements that further define the various internal zones and functions within the house.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

The depth of the rear facade creates an interstitial threshold, which is a space in itself to be occupied and provide a sense of enclosure.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

The idea is to create intermediating spaces that ground the house in relation to both its interior and exterior. Within the house the void acts as a centralising space via which other areas of the house interconnect.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

The stacking of the elements of the facade are contrasted by the seeming point loading at the exterior. The interior reveals the alternate nature where the structural loads are revealed. This duality through the facade re-emphasises the nature of the threshold space itself.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

Complimenting materials of near raw continuous length floorboards and a restrained palette of black aluminium, black steel, stainless steel and oak appear throughout the house and create a cohesive connection between original and new. These materials were selected, partially, so as not to compete with the ornate patterning of the original house along with their own inherent qualities.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence

The project's fundamental rationale is to create a family home that recognised the various needs of the occupiers, spaces for children and adults with a flexibility for both retreat and engagement.

Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence
Ground floor plan - click for larger image
Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence
First floor plan - click for larger image
Glebe House by Nobbs Radford Architects extends a Sydney residence
Section - click for larger image
  • Z-dog

    Shame that the exterior aesthetic of the blocks presents no usefulness inside apart from a lighting element. “Form follows function” does not have to be followed as a personal mantra but should at least be worth a consideration.

    • mitate

      Far too charitable. This is a distinct case of form (and not terribly coherent form) and no function. Louis Sullivan had it right all those years ago. shame so many architects pay little heed to it.

    • alex

      Storage? Paintings? Potted plants? I think the owners will find some use for them!

  • Charles

    This is great. It highlights a welcomed shift in Australian architecture.

    • Adrian

      With a comment like that I’m not sure you’re too up- to-date on Australian architecture.

  • CrankyFranky

    My first thought was they had a problem with overlooking from the side neighbours. So the deep recesses in the rear facade hinders that and offers more privacy.

    Then the amount of concrete – hmmm – cloistered?Someone loves the interiors of monasteries / churches? To me it looks a bit forbidding, cold and dark, but I trust it works for them

  • myth_

    A shift from what to what? And welcomed by who?

  • SCAQTony

    What is the shelf life of a concrete home? I heard estimates of 30-years but are these estimates accurate? Frank lloyd Wright’s Ennis house nearly disintegrated before it was rescued. I believe by 1980 it was in severe need of repair.

    I have always loved the look and solidity of a concrete house but will homes produced by Tadao Ando still be standing in a 1/2-century?

    Any guidance is appreciated.

  • msiajk

    Can the architects look up the meaning of ‘complimenting’ and ‘complementing’ before typing up their next project description?

  • Gary Walmsley

    If it weren’t for the raw grey concrete, I’d love it.

    I don’t hate concrete – I do have raw grey concrete. I’ve seen too many buildings that knew how to use concrete aesthetically to find this acceptable.