Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase
chairs that mix printed and natural grains

| 10 comments
 

Milan 2014: Japanese design studio Nendo has created a range of chairs with wood grain patterns printed onto natural timber for a forthcoming solo show in Milan.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

Nendo's series features six chairs, each one mixing a different combination of wood and printed grain.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

The Print-chairs feature two square wooden panels atop four legs connected by two pieces of interlocking metal. The simplicity of the design highlights the intricate series of patterns the Japanese studio has printed onto the seat and back rest of the chairs.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

"We experimented with different degrees of combination," said the designers. "For some seats we layered two different woodgrain patterns, and for others printed enlarged, abstracted woodgrain patterns onto the existing pattern."

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

In one example, the studio printed an enlargement of a grain typically found in a single piece of wood onto one with a finer grain. The result is a distorted perspective with the viewer uncertain of which grain is indigenous to the wood and which has been superimposed.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

In another instance, the team changed the angle of the original grain and printed it over the existing one.

Nendo Print Chair_dezeen_20

"We also experimented with other materials, printing a marble pattern onto the wood," said Nendo.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

Nendo also experimented with colour in the series. In one chair, a pale palette typically found in woods such as pine and birch gradually fades into deeper shades such as those seen in mahogany and teak.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

"Thanks to printing technology we could make fine adjustments like the scale, density and colours over and over, bringing out the charm and attraction of natural materials from a variety of angles," Nendo said.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

In perhaps the most extreme combination, Nendo created a chair out of chipboard and then printed a grain over the top.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

The six chairs will be exhibited at the studio's solo exhibition Works by Nendo at Via delle Erbe 2 in Milan's Brera district, during the city's design week in April.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

Other items to feature in the show include glass furniture patterned with visible brush strokes.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

Photographs are by Hiroshi Iwasaki.

Nendo's solo exhibition in Milan to showcase chairs that mix printed and natural grains

  • Concerned Citizen

    So, that’s like printing over gold to make it look like lead.

    Those chairs are miserable for a place to rest one’s butt. Until now I thought the Japanese were skilled woodworkers.

    • Fraperic

      Nope, it’s like me replying to your comment. It adds another level, leaving something of value.

      • Josh Nelson

        Whether or not I agree I don’t know, but I like your comment sir or madam. Here’s to another level.

      • Concerned Citizen

        Too bad it’s such a low level.

  • Nick Foster

    Daniel Weil was screen printing grain onto wood in the 90’s.

  • http://spacecraftpdx.com spacecraft

    Not impressive this time.

  • http://www.jacksonteece.com Paul B

    Get the design right first before the technology! They would be so uncomfortable.

  • sasha

    How many people work for Nendo now? A little too many I think. They’ve done good work but recently it’s been getting weaker.

  • aitchilm

    Maybe he will make a thousand of these and hang them on the wall. They’re not designed to sit on.

  • G

    In real life these things are absolutely stunning.