Cliff House by Dualchas Architects offers
panoramic views of a Scottish loch

| 9 comments
 

This cliffside home by Dualchas Architects on the north-west coast of Scotland's Isle of Skye mixes silvery larch wood with traditional Scottish stone.

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland

Designed by Scottish firm Dualchas Architects for a couple, Cliff House is a single-storey dwelling offering panoramic views of Loch Dunvegan in the picturesque setting within the Inner Hebrides.

The building was conceived as two connected volumes – one that nestles against the rugged terrain and another that opens out to the view.

Cliff-House-by-Dualchas

A wall of Caithness stone borders the south-east facade. This parts in the middle, in line with a dip in the landscape, framing an entrance route that reveals little about the spaces contained within.

"The building is first seen from the curved path as a wall in front of the dominant background," explained project architect Daniel Bar. "As the path unfolds and cuts deeper into the landscape, this relationship changes, with the building becoming the dominant focal point."

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland

The entrance leads through to a living and dining room that takes up a large section of the plan. The front of the space features floor-to-ceiling glazing, while a kitchen is tucked away at the back.

Ceiling rafters are exposed overhead, revealing the change in height between the house's two volumes. This allowed room for the architect to add clerestory windows that filter extra daylight across the space.

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland

The rest of the house follows the same pattern, with a pair of bedrooms benefitting from the view and two bathrooms slotted into the more secluded spaces behind.

"The idea of contradiction, as expressed in the elementary geometry of the building, is not only a reminder of the isolation and mystery of its location but also of the rarity of being able to live amongst the drama of the ever-changing atmospheric conditions in this part of the world," added Bar.

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland

A polished concrete floor runs throughout the interior, while larch clads the remaining exterior walls.

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland

Here's some more text from project architect Daniel Bar:


Cliff House, Galtrigill, Isle of Skye, Scotland

The site is located in north west Skye, overlooking Loch Dunvegan. It manifests itself as a contradiction: far reaching views to the north east and harsh winds from the south west. The constant is the horizon.

An existing ruin marks the entrance situation of the croft, while the edge of the cliff locates the dwelling on its site high above the water's edge, giving the connecting path a distinguished end.

Cliff-House-by-Dualchas

In order to address the site conditions, the building consists of two volumes; one closed, the other open. The first contains all serving functions to support the main open rooms. Together a place is created that provides shelter and privacy whilst maintaining focus on its surroundings.

The building is first seen from the curved path as a wall in front of the dominant background. As the path unfolds and cuts deeper into the landscape, this relationship changes, with the building becoming the dominant focal point. This suspense is released upon entry. One wall of the main open volume is omitted and the visitor stands in front of a fully glazed screen atop of the cliff. The topography of the site allows the surrounding landscape to be experienced as a panorama. The built space ends with the horizon.

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland
Site plan

The geometry of the two volumes are not only offset in length but also in height. The voids created are fully glazed and the volumes and their location remain readable from the inside. They act as vistas, remaining open in the in-between and looking back on both the building and its setting. Additional light enters the dwelling at in its centre, between the exposed rafters running the full length of the building.

While the typology of the building is specific to its surroundings, it was necessary to detail its appearance in a language that is commonly understood. Both the location and function of the two volumes are confirmed by the use of material. Caithness stone for the retaining wall and larch for the open plan main rooms. The height and hue of the horizontally laid courses correspond and merge both volumes into one building. The continuous horizontal plane of the polished concrete floor, acts to further blur the relationship between interior and exterior. As nature reclaims the site it is only the trampled grass of the path, that becomes domesticated in the landscape.

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland
Floor plan - click for larger image

On the interior, materials are omitted to give dominance to the characteristics of the site acting as a gallery filled with the objects and memories the client surrounds themselves with.

Living is a decision that is also defined by the choice of place. This dwelling seeks an answer through the specific means of architecture of how the qualities that make a place can be distilled into built matter in our times. The idea of contradiction, as expressed in the elementary geometry of the building, is not only a reminder of the isolation and mystery of its location but also of the rarity of being able to live amongst the drama of the ever changing atmospheric conditions in this part of the world: the reason behind a client's decision to purchase a plot in the first place. The dwelling can only provide the frame. How much building is required to inhabit a place?

Cliff House by Dualchas in Scotland
Section - click for larger image

Project Architect: Daniel Bar
Structural Engineer: IPM Associates
Environmental Constultant: An Cuilionn Consultancy
Drainage Consultant: JIG Environment
Contractor: James MacQueen
Site Address: Galtrigill, Isle of Skye
Treated Floor Area: 115 m2

 

  • harry wong

    Too few external photos

  • Michelle

    Breathtaking! Could you please add more photos, including the other unit next to the road?

    • mitate

      But don’t venture down the road; what you’ll discover will alter any perception of a remote idyll.

  • Jon

    Would the concrete floor be able to keep the house properly insulated? Especially in such a cold place. Would a floor like that require under floor heating or really heavy insulation?

    • Z-dog

      All houses in the British Isles have their floors insulated with different techniques.

      If the ground was quite boggy, it may be a floating slab with insulation and a polished concrete screed.

    • james

      No, but the insulation under the slab (or possibly just under a screed) will. Scotland has even more onerous Building Regulations than England, so it will have good insulation.

      The concrete should also provide good thermal capacity, helping to regulate temperatures between day and night.

      Of more concern environmentally is that the large area of glazing faces North East…

  • Dean Grey

    The perfect picture of isolation and tranquility.

  • sultony

    Have the prisoners escaped?

    • jed

      What can I do to get incarcerated in this beautiful prison?