Anny Wang uses contrasting materials
in Akin Collection of furniture

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Tubular steel frames support textured and iridescent materials that make up items in this furniture collection by Gothenburg designer Anny Wang (+ slideshow).

Akin Collection Float shelves by Ellika Henrikson

Anny Wang's Akin Collection contains a display shelf, cabinet and side table, each with similar base structures but different supplementary materials.



"Objects do not necessarily belong together just because they are similar in shape and appearance," Wang told Dezeen. "A kinship can exist through the differences."

Akin Collection Float shelves by Ellika Henrikson

Float is an open shelving unit made from blue powder-coated square tubular steel frame and blue-stained solid ash shelves. The unit has been designed with no clear front or back, enabling it to be placed in the centre of a room.

"The free corners, airy plan and its clear vertical lines give the shelf a light and open character," said Wang.

Akin Collection Float shelves by Ellika Henrikson

The Sway Cabinet also features a square tubular steel frame, the legs of which are powder-coated in light grey.

The storage compartment is enclosed with interwoven panels of chameleon vinyl – an iridescent material more typically used for high performance cars.

Akin Collection Float shelves by Ellika Henrikson

Chameleon vinyl appears bronze, gold, copper, pink or purple depending on the light and the angle it's viewed from.

"Sway stands for the closed and private," said the designer. "The upholstered feeling produces a flow and a more undulating shape that protrudes from the strict straight lines of the shelf and the cabinet's structure."

Akin Collection Float shelves by Ellika Henrikson

The collection also includes the Orbit side table, with copper-plated square tubular steel legs and a solid ash tabletop.

The legs are formed from a rectangular frame that protrudes up through the tabletop, creating a handle and a perpendicular L-shaped form.

Akin Collection Orbit table by Ellika Henrikson

A visual contrast is provided by the circular tabletop, which can be removed and used as a large tray.

"I find it interesting how things can be connected through their contradictions," said Wang. "One obvious example is puzzle pieces - they fit together and create a whole through their directly opposite forms."

Akin Collection Orbit table by Ellika Henrikson

Wang learnt to weld using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) so she could build the collection herself. She graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design from the University of Gothenburg in June and now works as a multidisciplinary designer in Sweden.

Photography is by Ellika Henrikson.