Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards
at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary

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Budapest studio Gereben Marián mixed cement with local earth and rock to create the rugged walls of this series of buildings, which accommodate visitors to a vineyard in the Eger wine region of Hungary (+ slideshow).

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Zsolt Frikker

The client asked Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián to design a wine-tasting terrace. The architects had already completed a wine cellar but it is located in an unsightly industrial area, so the client was keen to create a visitor attraction in the more picturesque setting of the vineyards.

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Zsolt Frikker

In time the idea evolved, and the Almagyar Wine Terrace project eventually become a series of buildings and spaces, including small sleeping cabins, a swimming pool, a camping area and a lookout tower.



Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Zsolt Frikker

"The design procedure took quite a long time, around five years," Gereben told Dezeen. "The client thought he would just make a terrace offering wine, but then he started to to think about making bungalows you can rent, and camping spots between the trees."

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Zsolt Frikker

Around the site, the architects discovered a plentiful stock of tuff – a volcanic ash created when wine cellars are carved out of the stone – and decided to use it for the walls of the new buildings.

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Dávid Lukács

"In this area, the oldest cellars are cut out of this stone," said Gereben. "It is a waste material that can be used for free, so we thought we might be able to recycle it, creating a cheap solution that reflects the concept of the winery."

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Zsolt Frikker

The powdered tuff was used to create an earth concrete, which provides the walls of the terrace and the three bungalows.

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Zsolt Frikker

These were completed by the addition of a gable metal roof and reclaimed furnishings, from a hand-washing "trough" with copper fittings to second-hand lamps and cement tiles.

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Zsolt Frikker

"The huts resemble the archaic buildings of the wine region with their characteristic proportions and use of materials," said the architects.

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Dávid Lukács

"The folded roof structure of the terrace provides a perfect place to relax and enjoy the scenic view with a glass of wine," they added.

Earthy cabins hide amongst the vineyards<br /> at the Almagyar Wine Terrace in Hungary by by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Photograph by Dávid Lukács

The lookout point is a narrow tower built from wood, giving a vantage point over the rural landscape, while the swimming pool offers the opportunity for a dip to cool off.


Projects credits:

Architecture: Gereben Marián Architects Ltd – Péter Gereben, Balázs Marián
Project Team: Gergely Álmos, Péter Mészáros, Tamás Mezey, Kálmán Nyilas
Client: Almagyar Archiepiscopal Wine Estate Ltd.
Contractor: Imre Mészáros

AÉS Wine Terrace and Spa by Péter Gereben and Balázs Marián
Site plan – click for larger image
  • Sceptical

    What a lovely project.