Long Island house by Bates Masi Architects has adjustable sound barriers for walls

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New York studio Bates Masi Architects added sprung cedar boards that can be acoustically "tuned" to this house in The Hamptons, so residents can have noisy parties without disturbing their neighbours (+ slideshow).

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

Designed for studio co-founder Paul Masi, Elizabeth II house occupies a site in Amagansett, a hamlet on Long Island's south shore.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

Each element of the design is intended to provide acoustic insulation and privacy from the town village, which is a popular holiday destination for New Yorkers.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

"Too often, architecture fixates on the visual sense, with little regard for the other faculties of perception," said the studio. "The location of this house, in the heart of a bustling resort town, demanded special consideration of the acoustic sense."



"Research in architectural acoustics drove the form, materials, and detail of the house, not only shielding the property from the sound of the village, but also manipulating interior details to create a unique acoustic character for the house."

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

Tall concrete walls spanning the height of the property were cast in one pour to create homogeneity between the two floors.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

These walls are covered with foam insulation and clad with timber siding panels, creating an acoustic buffer. The walls also overlap in some places, creating even more of a sound barrier.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

Stainless steel clips attach the cedar boards to the walls, designed to prolong the life of the siding. The spring-like clips tension the boards, allowing the wood to flex and preventing it from splitting.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

Variations of these clips are used throughout the interior as clothes hooks, cabinet pulls and as hinges for an adjustable sound baffle in the open-plan living space.

Here, adjustable boards are spaced in front of a felt panel and can be  "acoustically tuned" for more intimate gatherings or noisy parties.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

Two en-suite bathrooms are set at either end of the living space and open onto an adjoining deck overlooking a swimming pool.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

A wooden staircase with open risers connects a basement workshop with the two upper levels. The thickness of the stair tread tapers, changing the pitch of each footstep as residences ascend to the upper floor.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

Here, three children's bedrooms and a bathroom are lined up against windows overlooking the garden and pool. A long corridor at the back of the site connects the rooms and buffers the rooms from the street.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

"The stair is tuned to create a subtle acoustic experience," explained the architects. "The research of sound and how it affects our perception of space informed the details, materials, and form of the project."

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi

"This approach to the design led to a richer and more meaningful home for the family," they added.

Photography is courtesy Bates Masi Architects.

Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi
Site plan – click for larger image
Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Elizabeth II house by Bates Masi
First floor plan – click for larger image

 

  • thepixinator

    It’s a beautiful home, but I still don’t understand the mechanics of the acoustical tuning. I think this is one place I’d have to walk through and experience directly to really appreciate. Dezeen field trip!

  • Sim

    Really, sometimes I wish that I had other peoples problems.