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Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

This seat by Nicholas Le Moigne of Switzerland is made entirely of scrap fibre cement. 

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

Called Trash Cube, the object is made from the discarded bits of a material typically used to make roofing tiles, by Swiss manufacturers Eternit.

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

Workers in the factory throw offcuts into a cube-shaped mould where they're squashed together and left to dry for a few hours.

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

The appearance of the seat depends on the scraps that are produced each day.

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

Photographs are by Tonatiuh Ambrosetti and Daniela Droz.

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

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Here's a tiny bit of text from the designer:


Trash Cube
Produced by Eternit
Designed by Nicolas Le Moigne

Tons of material produced by Eternit are thrown away every year. The idea of the Trash Cube was to design the most simple object recycling as more scraps as possible. The Trash Cube is made of Eternit (which is the name of the Swiss factory and of the material they produces).

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

Made of cement and fibers this material is used for moulding tiles for architecture, flowerpots or some outdoor objects. Tons of left over material is thrown away every year and the purpose of the Trash Cube was to find a way to recycle most of it. The idea was to design the most basic mould in which the workers would throw scraps as soon as they have finish to mould the other pieces in production.

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

Drying in few hours the Trash Cube is removed from the mould every morning. As the Trash Cube is made of very different sizes and shapes of raw material, each stool has a different appearance - like small unique sculptures. This very simple technique makes the price very cheap (about a 100 Eur/piece).

Trash Cube by Nicolas Le Moigne

Dimensions : 32 x 32 x 36 cm
Material : Eternit (cement and fibres)


See also:

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Bent by
Anne-Cécile Rappa
One Day Paper Waste by
Jens Praet
Rainer Mutsch
for Eternit