Landsdowne Gardens used to be a derelict dental surgery
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Phillips Tracey replaces a derelict London dental surgery with a simple brick house

A brick wall conceals the majority of this two-storey house that Phillips Tracey Architects has slotted between a pair of heritage-listed buildings in south London (+ slideshow).

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

Previously the site of a derelict dental surgery, the Lansdowne Gardens property follows the form of the original building – creating the illusion of a one-storey structure from street level.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

"From the pavement the house appears as a single-storey pavilion," explained Brendan Tracey, director of Surrey-based Phillips Tracey Architects. "Its true nature as a two-storey structure is only revealed beyond the entrance, which is set into the restored boundary wall."

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

Aiming to fit in with the surroundings, Phillips Tracey opted for yellow-toned brickwork similar to the walls of the neighbouring Georgian buildings, but of a slightly lighter hue.

"The striking brickwork complements the surrounding environment, while allowing the house to offer an outstanding contemporary presence," said Tracey. "The relatively light yellow colouring offers a gentle tonal contrast with the darker brick of the older buildings to either side."

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

A black door partway along the wall provides an entrance to the property. From here, residents either enter through a second door, or walk around to a pair of multi-level terraces on one side.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

Large expanses of glazing create views between the terraces and the living spaces within. There is also a large window framed in black aluminium on the other side of the building – showcasing an oak staircase that connects the ground floor to the basement level.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

Polished concrete flooring runs throughout the property, while the walls – with the exception of a concrete wall within the master bedroom – are plastered and whitewashed.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

On the ground floor, the main living area leads out onto the paved courtyard.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

A dining area connects the living space and kitchen, which can be hidden behind folding doors to allow the area to function as a "simple, minimalistic space for entertainment and relaxation".

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

On the basement level, bedrooms are offset from the oak-panelled hallway, and each have access to decked outdoor spaces.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

"The bedrooms occupy a series of deep lightwells, which allow large levels of natural light to enter the lower level and dispel any impression of being in a typical basement," Tracey explained.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

While the master bedroom has an en-suite shower room, a large family bathroom with a wooden sink and grey tiled walls serves the rest of the house.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects

Other recently completed residential projects in south London include a pale brickwork extension to an end-of-terrace by Tsuruta Architects and a five-bedroom house with walls of opaque glass by Ian McChesney.

Photography is by Jack Hobhouse.

Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects
Elevation – click for larger image
Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects
Elevation – click for larger image
Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects
First floor plan – click for larger image
Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects
Basement level plan – click for larger image
Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects
Section – click for larger image
Lansdowne Gardens by Phillips Tracey Architects
Section – click for larger image