Dutch Invertuals exhibition displays intangibles as physical items
Tags:

Search results:

Dutch Invertuals' Advanced Relics exhibition displays intangibles as physical items

Milan 2016: this year's Dutch Invertuals exhibition in Milan featured tactile objects designed as physical representations of emotions, beliefs and even galactic phenomena (+ slideshow).

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Carlo Lorenzetti explored the notion of familiarity with a selection of strangely shaped vessels and containers

The Advanced Relics exhibition by the Dutch Invertuals collective was curated by Wendy Plomp, and featured a group of nine selected designers who explored topics they felt reflective of today's society.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Omnipotence of Thought by Carlo Lorenzetti

In each of their projects, the designers aimed to manifest an idea, a feeling, or a situation – all things that can't be touched – as a physical item. The objective was to counteract the increasingly digital, and therefore untouchable, world we live in.

"Increasingly we are converting our physical presence into a digital one, like we create our own avatars – digital reflections of our personality," Plomp told Dezeen. "What do we really need? Objects to hold on to, to get comfort by and to reflect our physical identity."

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Martina Lasinger created pieces based on the creation of the galaxy

"Within Advanced Relics the dialogue that led up was mainly about how objects change from functional-based, to more objects that have a deeper meaning," she added. "Besides functional objects, there is also place for new rituals, objects to worship and new ways of handling."

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
A Matter of Time by Martina Lasinger

"To become more conscious about the value of things, by the handling and passing time, we wanted to make a statement and present a collection of contemporary relics, showing their precision, skills, symbolism and phenomena," she continued.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Bastiaan De Nennie's totem-like pieces are designed to create a tactile version of the non-physical things that we believe in

For example, designer Bastiaan De Nennie's colourful totem-like pieces were created as tactile versions of the non-physical things that we believe in.

"In my work I try to create shapes that visualise our imagination and beliefs, to give a physical presence to my dreamscapes through relics," he said.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Pagans by Bastiaan De Nennie

"Believing in something that doesn't exist, in a religious sense, has been replaced by believing in something intangible, the digital," he continued. "Because that intangible world has become so intertwined with our lives, we put our faith in something that doesn't exist without even realising it."

"My work tries to shape this new world and show what it is we actually believe in," he added.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Daniel De Bruin's Fosfeen is based on the sun, and is made up of a strip of orange-coloured LEDs submerged into a shallow tray of liquid

Daniel De Bruin's Fosfeen is based on the sun, and is made up of a strip of orange-coloured LEDs submerged into a shallow tray of liquid.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Fosfeen by Daniel De Bruin

"I have always been fascinated with the sun, the ultimate relic of our time," he said. "My work tries to invoke the delicate balance between its beautiful light and blinding brightness."

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
The Melancholic Nature of Relics by Nel Verbeke

Nel Verbeke explored the "melancholic" nature of relics, and created a series of black-coloured everyday objects including a mirror and a lamp.

"Gazing and considering a relic, a memento reminds us of our vulnerability and vanity, and by doing so reminding us also to live," she said. "In my designs I recreate and design objects that have given the veiling meaning of memento a physical place in our everyday lives."

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Tijmen Smeulder's Parts, Antenna & Pleat pieces are a selection of objects with exaggerated colours and textiles designed to provide a sensorial experience

Tijmen Smeulder's Parts, Antenna & Pleat pieces are a selection of objects with exaggerated colours and textiles designed to provide a sensorial experience.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Parts, Antenna & Pleat by Tijmen Smeulder

Studio Truly Truly – which previously designed a collection of flexible looped LED lights – looked to the perception of objects, and created a series of ornamental vessels intended to look "ceremonial".

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Study Truly Truly created a series of ornamental vessels intended to look "ceremonial"

"We are fascinated with how an object is perceived or experienced," the studio said. "Balancing unexpected material combinations, visual detail and ways of use, we force the user to look twice and wonder."

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Hongjie Yang investigated the convergence of natural and technical processes

"These objects should give the feeling of ceremonial objects," they added. "Their familiar and unfamiliar nature should create tension and mystery so that you can’t help but wonder and imagine about their purpose or significance."

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
The Synthesis Monolith by Hongjie Yang

Carlo Lorenzetti also explored this notion of familiarity with a selection of strangely shaped vessels and containers, while Hongjie Yang investigated the convergence of natural and technical processes.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
EDHV investigated the possibilities of merging technology with unpredictable materials

Other objects in the exhibition included pieces based on the creation of the galaxy by Martina Lasinger, and a project by EDHV that investigates the possibilities of merging technology with unpredictable materials.

Advanced Relics exhibition by Dutch Invertuals
Ceramic Symphony by EDHV

This year's Dutch Invertuals exhibition took place from 12 to 17 April 2016 at the O'gallery space on Via Pastrengo, as part of Milan design week.

Also during the event, a group of Design Academy Eindhoven students similarly explored the topic of the virtual world, and put on an exhibition featuring objects and installations that are all designed to be touched.