Korean craft on show in London's Make Your Movement exhibit

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Contemporary Korean craft to be showcased in London's Make Your Movement exhibition

An exhibition in London dedicated to Korean craft will present pieces by 18 designers exploring the concept of movement (+ slideshow).

Titled Make Your Movement, the exhibition brings together 18 designers, makers and craftspeople from Korea whose work includes 3D-printed accessories, jewellery and ceramics.

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
The Make Your Movement exhibition in London is dedicated to Korean craft and features pieces like Bomi Park's Gyungsang

Each piece explores the theory of movement within craft – from the way makers move while creating work to the journey the object takes once it is completed.

"When we planned this exhibition we discussed the word movement, [but] the primary meaning of movement knows no immediate distinction in the East and the West," said curator Kyoungrin Park. "The exhibition uses Movement as its starting point, [and explores] the semantic layers hidden in this single word."

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
Kiyeon Jeong will present objects for eating and drinking, including these shelves and small table

Through these "layers", the exhibition aims to provide a complete overview of the Korean craft industry – showing how traditional production methods have adapted to changes in Korean culture and modern-day society.

Pieces on show will include lacquered metal trays that double as hanging pictures, 3D-printed objects that have also been manipulated by hand, paper-thin ceramics, and pieces of furniture designed for traditional market traders.

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
Also on show is Kyeok Kim's Wrapped Skin, which is made out of parchment and iron wire

Kiyeon Jeong will present a range of objects designed for eating and drinking that change depending on movement and use – an outcome of research into mundane daily tasks.

Similarly, Practice in Daily Life by Sangmin Lee derives from daily actions. He crafts small objects, which are created through a thorough process of daily practice.

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
Martha Sungwon Lee will exhibit objects with a double functionality

Kyeok Kim will show a range of "body extensions" that have been made entirely of an edible collagen material, while design studio Fabrikr has created a series of objects using discarded pieces of fabric.

To create his collection of ceramic pieces, Deokho Kim developed a technique of trimming away at a piece of mixed colour clay while it rotates on a spinning wheel – leaving a marbled effect.

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
Shell Lounge Chair by Kyungtaek Roh features shells that represent the many faces of individuals and society

A number of ceramic objects will also be exhibited, including Inhwa Lee's works with porcelain and Jucheol Yun's Bunchong pieces that feature spikes made from enamel.

The only designer to be showcasing furniture is Kyungtaek Roh, whose collection is based on the theme of shells.

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
Yongjoo Kim explores the uses of Velcro hook-and-loop fastenings

Many exhibiting designers have explored the role of digital techniques in craft. Yong-Jin Chung has combined 3D-printing with traditional metalwork, while Seongman Ahn designs using CNC and 3D-printing machines but introduces modifications informed by his research.

Other pieces on show throughout the exhibition include a collection of artworks made up of microscopic fragments, a sound installation, a series of photographs showcasing unusual activities in Korea, and a collection of ceramics that tell time.

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
Jucheol Yun created the spiked effect on the piece Cheomjang by covering ceramics with enamel

The furniture design industry is currently experiencing a revival of craft and traditional making methods.

One of the leading figures in the movement has been Sebastian Cox, whose work has included an "urban rustic" kitchen featuring rough-sawn timber, and a series of weaved products that aimed to revive the historical craft of swilling.

Make Your Movement, Korean contemporary objects exhibition at the Korean Cultural Centre in London
Hyeran Kim applied global recording systems to movements and space in Mechanical Gymnastics

Other designers reviving traditional crafts include Moss & Lam, who recently launched a series of tables created using an "alchemic" technique rediscovered by the studio, and Wingardhs' Tattoo stool, decorated using a UNESCO-listed carving technique.

Make Your Movement runs from 1 August to 17 September at the Korean Cultural Centre in London.