Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

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Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Spanish architect Javier Peña of Xpiral has completed two houses in Murcia, Spain, with the lower volume built from stacked ceramic wine racks.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Called Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada, the project comprises two residences, with one cantilevered above the other.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Some of the holes in the wine racks that make up the lower level are plugged with coloured ceramic tiles.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Photographs are by David Frutos.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Here's some more information, written by María José Marcos:


Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada (2004-2009)

The two houses are built in height, using the full width of the parcel.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

The architect named this concept as “vivienda atresada”, exploring the concept of geminated houses in height.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

The house that develops from the facade of the main street is named as house of the ´land´, while the house “sky” is facing the mountain.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

The innovative facade is made wine rack made of ceramics with circular tiles that close the holes of the wine racks, controling the visual and climate permeability of the house.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

These ceramic pieces are an innovative design of Xpiral Office.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Architect: Javier Peña. XPIRAL

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Program: two private houses

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Collaborators: Jesús Galera.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Year: 2009

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Client: Private.

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Location: Torreagüera, MURCIA, SPAIN

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

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Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

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Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

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Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

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Torreagüera Vivienda Atresada by Xpiral

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See also:

.

Urezkoenea House by Peña Ganchegui y Asociados Trufa by Anton
García-Abril
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stories
  • margo

    what is with this cantilever trend. looks like evryone is trying to outdo eachother

  • edward

    The odd configuration and very colorful materials work well in the arid landscape. Good work!

  • http://www.urbanizr.org urbanizr

    so now we are all missing pics of the colorful wall from the inside…?

  • http://www.georgehollander.com George

    That’s a very” ambitious” cantilever!

  • di

    too much information… too many dots blips and textures…feels like a community centre fora regenration area than a residence. it does not feel calm this place…

  • http://www.fgoesarte.blogspot.com FELIPE GOES

    Great design ! Beatiful use of diferrent textures and materials.

  • Richard

    always loved the spanish use of colours but too many different textures I feel.

  • edward

    Looks like a double wall so the wine crates wouldn’t show on the inside. Like to see tha iterior with furnishings thought the houses look more about the exterior than the interior.

  • http://gaininja.blogspot.com gaininja

    Too much. The cantilever is so extreme I’d be nervous of entering that part of the building lest it slowly tips down and starts sliding down the hill. . The mirrors are nice and terracotta fine, but all those coured plugs and that vile concrete/grass groundcover kills it.

  • g.best

    This project is a “house-shaped” materials showcase… it shows a total lack of aesthetic coherence!

  • http://www.archialternative.com Albert

    Bold, progressive, innovative, very modern and stylish.
    But here’s some questions: would you call it beautiful? Is there an aesthetic that pleases our eye? Is there a harmony?

    Just asking questions. Nothing else

  • damfak

    I think the "wine racks" are hollow bricks very used in Mexico for construction… the different thing is that in Mexico they use it with the flat side towards the outside.

    The house is a Bold statement of design. Too much of everything.

  • edward

    Quirky design with exuberant variety of materials.but should bring some life into the desert landscape.

  • nico

    ditto re: “ambitious” cantilever. the material choices are too much for my taste. i agree about there being a lack of harmony between materials but can respect the fact that this project isn’t a complete concrete bunker. i really like the drawings, especially the rendered sections

  • al matta

    Finally, an interesting modernist box!

  • http://www.art2arch.net Ralph Martin

    CANTILEVER!!! YES! Obviously not built in USA because it would be EXTREMELY difficult to get a Structural Engineer to not only THINK of doing this, but actually doing this & stamping/signing the structural drawings due to litigious actions / potential lawsuits.

    Anyway…GREAT DESIGN, love the concrete & wine racks with ceramic infill tiles + the swinging perforated shade devices.

    Very Cool!
    Ralph Martin Architect | Seattle, WA.

  • thedesignformula

    Would be interesting to see the wine racks finished in another color. Perhaps white?

  • martini-girl

    I don't 'get' the wine rack with the coloured tiles.

    Is it simply a superfluous decorative aplication? If so it doesn't work.

    Or is it a screening device against sun or to create beutiful interior light? If so, I want to see inside photos.

  • zecks

    I guess land fill charges in spain must be pretty low!