Apartment in Kamitakada
by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

| 5 comments

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

Japanese firm Takeshi Yamagata Architects have squeezed four  buildings containing nine apartments onto a small suburban site in Tokyo.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

Apartment in Kamitakada sits on a 300 square-metre site with apartments ranging from thirty to sixty square metres.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

Curved, perforated steel fences meander across the site to enclose a private garden and entrance for each flat.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

The apartment blocks are a steel-frame construction and range from two to four storeys.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

Here's some more from the architects:


Apartment in crowded area of Tokyo

This is a rental apartment for single and young couple in Tokyo.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

The site is in the residential area where the atmosphere of downtown remains.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

A lot of old wooden houses have been overcrowded in the surrounding.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

In crowded area of Tokyo, we planned the bright and comfortable apartment where charm of living in downtown is felt.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

Open atmosphere like private house

This building is 4 stories high, and is composed of the first floor part build on a full site and the upper floor part divided into four houses.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

There are 9 units, from 30 sq m to 60 sq m. In the first floor, the curved walls divide the full site into each units including outside space.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

The units have private approach and garden. Although each unit is very compact, but can get bright and open atmosphere like private house.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

The curved wall in the garden is made from the steel fence, and shows a clear boundary, yet very open. So, all of the private gardens are independent space, but are also slightly connected to a large garden network.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

By this reason, the first floor has open and comfortable space compared with general apartment.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

In the upper floor, the building is separated into four houses, accordingly light and the wind reach the garden ground.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

From the top floor, we can look over the surrounding towns, and enjoy the atmosphere of downtown.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

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Our attempt is to create living spaces with new charm by utilizing the typical living environment in Tokyo.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

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Combined structure

The structure is a steel-frame building.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

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Four simple box-shaped houses transmit an earthquake power to the outdoor wall through a horizontal brace in the second floor level.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

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The basics of structure that cropped out outdoors are united and, as a whole, become one stable building.

Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

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Apartment in Kamitakada by Takeshi Yamagata Architects

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See also:

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  • K-7

    nice loo.

  • http://www.facebook.com/rbothma Robert Bothma

    wow, you can take a dump and let all your neighbours and strangers on the street watch…..great fun!!

  • robotlikerobot

    sign me up!

  • micky

    it's very japanese

  • antonius

    What's the point of this transparency? This is such an overrated theme. And a lot of architects are obsessed with it.