Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

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Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

This belt-driven clock was designed by Argentinian designer Daniel Weil of Pentagram as a gift for an architect.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

The timepiece displays minutes and hours on the outside and inside of a nickle-plated ring, while the battery is housed away from the main mechanism and connected by visible wires recessed in the wooden base.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

The alarm hand can be set by turning a key to drive the connecting rubber belt.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

More clocks on Dezeen »

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

The information that follows is from Pentagram:


Privately commissioned to create a gift for an architect, Daniel Weil created a one-of-a-kind clock that is both simple and complex.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

Reducing objects to their component parts has long fascinated Weil.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

The Radio in a Bag he created for his degree show at the Royal College of Art three decades ago is an icon of 20th century industrial design.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

This clock is the latest demonstration of his interest in investigating not just how objects look, but how they work.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

Constructed in ash and nickel-plated brass and silver, the clock is built of five separate elements. The numbers, both hours and minutes, are inscribed on the face and interior of a 9 3/4-inches diameter ring. The mechanism for setting the time connects with the central mechanism with visible rubber belts.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

A single AA battery provides power to the clock through visible power strips that are recessed in the assembly’s base. (Note the different screws that support the battery stand, keyed to the positive and negative poles of the power source.)

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

And, befitting the object’s recipient, the housing for the central mechanism takes the form of, literally, a house.

Clock for an Architect by Daniel Weil

“Objects like clocks are both prosaic and profound,” says Weil. “Prosiac because of their ubiquity in everyday life, profound because of the mysterious nature of time itself. Time can be reduced to hours, minutes and seconds, just as a clock can be reduced to its component parts. This doesn’t explain time, but in a way simply exposes its mysterious essence.”


See also:

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The Front & Back by Giha Woo
and Shingoeun
The Alarming Clock
by Natalie Duckett
Nespresso Battery
by Mischer’Traxler
| 10 comments

Posted on Tuesday, December 7th, 2010 at 3:28 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • JuiceMajor

    I want one!

  • nicey

    haute couture steam punk for bankers

  • Bo!

    Santa, I want this for christmas.

  • http://adlarchitetto.blogspot.com/ adl architetto

    interesting design. unfortunately its not obvious how its related to architects in any way.

    • JIB

      IT HAS A RULER ON THE BASE … AND WHAT LOOKS LIKE A HOUSE HOLDING THE MECHANICAL COMPONENTS …

      WELL IT WAS JUST COMIISIONED FOR AN ARCHITECT … IT DOESNT ACTUALLY HAVE TO BE ACRHITECT SPECIFIC … ITS NOT SAYING THAT THE CLOCK IS FOR ARCHITECTS … JUST THE ONE WHO PAID HIM

      NICE CLOCK THOUGH … SORTA

      KINDA LONG AND CUMBERSOME …

      I THINK THE IDEAS COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER EXECUTED

      ALTHOUGH IT DOES REPRESENT A VERY DECONSTRUCTED OBJECT …

  • stillunwritten

    like adl architetto mentioned above;I don't understand relation.

    • clint eastwood

      architetto and stillunwritten, does it have to relate to architects for it to be nice? relax and just enjoy it and stop trying so hard

    • tindo

      It's for an architect, and the block the arrows are attached to is house shaped

  • stillunwritten

    But I am not searching nice.just try to understand what is about?Maybe when I understand;it will be seen nicer more than now

  • MdShafiqM

    In architectural terminology this gimmick is probably described as "inside-out".