Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

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Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

This extension to a family house with marble brise-soleils on the rear façade in New South Wales, Australia, is by Australian practice Carter Williamson Architects.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The house is a new addition to an existing timber cottage, which could not be removed from the site.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The original cottage sits in front of the new structure and is connected to it by a little covered courtyard area.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

At the back of the house a concrete framework provides shading from the east and west, with horizontal marble slabs slotted in between.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

On the ground floor, a large tri-fold glazed door extends the open plan living space out to the garden.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

A bedroom, study, library and bathroom are located on the first floor.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Photographs are by Brett Boardman.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

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Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The following information is from the architects:


The brief was to bring light into our clients’ home and their lives.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Their old home was Victorian, dark and periodically tight and depressing. It was little changed when we got it.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The original house on the site is an 1860s timber cottage sourced, sawn and constructed from local timber.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

A L+EC ruling had virtually made it a heritage item, which came with court-defined planning concessions.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The design is for a new building to sit sympathetically behind and recessive from the original cottage.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The new building touches the old through a light, small connection that locates a gothic-like courtyard and the front door.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The square ground floor houses the kitchen, living and dining rooms.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Large voids puncture the upper level plan, organising the space between bedroom, study and library.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The voids spatially organise the ground plan defining the kitchen, dining and circulation.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The rear facade is a composition of light and shade.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Strong off-form concrete blades attenuate east and west light, while marble horizontal louvres control northern light.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

The formal rhythm of the vertical blades are offset by the playfulness of the horizontal louvres.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

A roof garden hides the garage and defines an amphitheatre to the living room.

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Team Architect: Shaun Carter

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Designers: Patrick Fitzgerald, Mattia Fiumani

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects

Balmain House by Carter Williamson Architects


See also:

.

Long Island House by
Kanner Architects
Casa Doble by María Langarita & Víctor Navarro House with Concrete Louvers by StudioGreenBlue
  • gaylealstrom

    Wonderful. That it seems so out of place in the neighborhood that it's located in is cool. There goes the neighborhood, but in a new and upward direction. I'd be happy just living in the original cottage to be that close to it.

  • mike

    what's going on here? are we all formated?

  • andy

    Plans & Sections would help!

  • meow

    Too bad the cottage wasnt involved.
    A waste of space…
    Otherwise one should merged it to use any space available

  • Vee

    why marble as a material choice? also how is the courtyard gothic like?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001857394783 Thomas Washington

    Those marble light shelves are incredible. I love this design as the interior is flooded with natural light and the facade is a great composition of stone light shelves. Nice Work.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1815210240 Peter van der Veer

    Lovely lifestyle living in that part of Sydney but I wonder if the owners will tire of the red Chinese screen.

  • Angel

    The connexion between the original house and the new building is not well illustrated. Pity, it's one of the interesting point of that projet.

  • bwd

    Will the marble sag and crack in 20 years? 30?
    Maybe it's thick enough for this use, maybe not. -doesn't look so good when it fails….