House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

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House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Wooden steps lead to an attic with irregular sloping walls in this residence for an artist in Shiga, Japan, by Japanese studio Tato Architects.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

The wood-panelled attic space is connected to the main residence of House in Hiedaira by apertures in the leaning surfaces, which look down into the main living space below.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

A separate workshop building for the client's work sits adjacent and slightly forward from the house, taking the same gabled form.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

The two-storey wooden structure is clad completely in corrugated polycarbonate panels.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Photographs are by Satoshi Shigeta unless otherwise stated.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

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House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

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House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

The following information is from the architects:


The residence is located at the foot of Mt. Hiei near the border of Kyoto and Shiga.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photograph is by Tato Architects

The client is an artist, who needed an atelier and a home for his family, as well as a place for his parents whom he wishes to live together in the future.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

With a regulation that mandates sloped roofs, the site is surrounded by gable-roofed houses which seem to provide a sense of calmness in the neighborhood.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photograph is by Tato Architects

Accordingly, we developed a plan that fits to the surrounding environment of this hillside residential area. The site was not large enough to accommodate all the needs of the client.  In addition, we were informed that an atelier may cause noise and odor.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photograph is by Tato Architects

Taking these constraints into consideration, we developed a plan in which three independent cottage-style houses--an atelier and two mini houses (one for the client's family and the other for his parents)--are arranged in such a way to share the watering and drainage area.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

The construction of the atelier was simplified to meet the low-budget limitation.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photograph is by Tato Architects

Cement excelsior boards, serving as fire-resistant thermal insulators and bearing wall structures, were attached to the structure, which were then covered with corrugated polycarbonate plates.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Thermal storage using night time electricity is buried under the ground to provide underfloor heat through the foundation. Bare concrete is used as the finished floor.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Likewise, walls and roofs is bare structural materials, which makes it allows the artist/client himself to renovate the building according to the clientÅfs changing needs.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photograph is by Tato Architects

The large opening is created on the north side of the building to provide natural sunlightillumination. In addition, cement excelsior board can be removed to receive sunlight from various parts of the walls.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photograph is by Yousuke Takeda

The size and arrangement of windows of the two dwelling houses are scaled to follow the proportion of conventional cottage style, which has an effect of making the houses look smaller than they actually are.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

The ground level floors of these houses are simply finished with mortar in order to efficiently transmit the heat from the thermal storage system under the foundation.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photograph is by Yousuke Takeda

Lauan plywood is used for the interior walls, part of which are painted white by the client himself. The second floor does not need huge room, but needs sufficient space.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

If a vertical wall is built, the wall divides the second floor to a very small room and void area. Therefore, instead of a vertical wall, a wall is built to give required space to the rooms.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Above photographs is by Tato Architects

The lean wall becomes roof-like-ceiling as well as hill-like-floor dividing the second floor space.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

The lean wall also looks like a cottage accommodating another small cottage inside. Normally, a cottage is regarded that inside and outside is the same.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

In this case, the cottage is not very simple accommodating another cottage inside like crystal.

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Project information

Project name: House in hieidaira
Location: Shiga Japan
Site area: 490.00m2

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Building area: 116.01m2
Total floor area: 186.14m2
Type of Construction: Wooden

House in Hieidaira by Tato Architects

Designed by Yo Shimada.
Design period : Apr. 2008 - Dec. 2009
Construction period : Dec. 2009 - Apr. 2010


See also:

.

House K by
Yoshichika Takagi
House in Fukawa by
Suppose Design Office
Belly House by
Tomohiro Hata
  • http://www.builtfabricblog.blogspot.com Rube

    I really don't enjoy the stair rail and one or two other details, but this is a good project and the sectional perspective is great. Turning a restriction(pitched roof) into a conceptual asset that informs the room shapes makes this great architecture.

  • yulm

    climbing again?

  • A one

    I wonder who pays for that. I mean, it is ok as an exercise, but to live there? No…

  • coz

    Amazingly though, there are many clients who wants to live in a avant-garde house in japan. Especially among young people.

  • http://www.designbono.com design BONO

    simple is best…..one material………

  • fivedollarshake

    this is the very first japanise project i see that doesn't have kids running around in the fotos:)

  • http://www.saimanmiah.com Saiman

    Great Exhibition, and a fun house for a young family perhaps… although quite impractical.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001857394783 Thomas Washington

    A beautiful sophisticated project with some incredible geometric spaces.

  • http://www.vrijehand.nl Raoul Vleugels

    I would definitely live there!

  • http://www.brgstudio.com nulla

    Nice project, made in Japan, but in a western style. A very interesting work.

    • angela

      I don't think this is western style, this is japanese contemporary style, like sou fujimoto and other japanese architects that study the habitation concepts, they make a very unique approach to architecture.

  • Faried de bruyns

    The attic will keep-out children and older folks. I like the picture window at the end of the kitchen.

  • Linda

    why its impractical?the stairs are the typical of many other houses…the walls are not any hindrance to functionality and its context aware