Single Family House St Joseph
by Wolfgang Tschapeller

| 26 comments

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

This concrete house on stilts is a family home in Austria by Vienna studio Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Called Single Family House St Joseph, the exposed concrete structure features irregular-shaped windows and sits on four supporting legs.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

A shallow pit has been dug underneath the hovering building and can be utilised as a car port or storage space.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Despite the flat planes of the exterior shell, the interior space features a series of faceted walls, forming oddly-shaped rooms and windows.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

The interior spaces are finished completely in white, with the exception of wooden flooring in some rooms and the treads of the staircase, which cantilever out of the wall.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Photographs are by Lukas Schaller unless otherwise stated.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

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Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

The following information is from the architects:


Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller ArchitektSt. Joseph

St. Joseph is a concrete form to be made habitable independent of the building site.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

The concrete shell is placed at the edge of the remainder of a plain along the Danube floodplains.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Its basic measurements are 615 cm by 620 cm by 2230 cm.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Roland Krauss

The concrete form is set on 4 supports – one one-legged element, two two-legged elements and one three-legged element.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Its distance from the ground ranges from 120 cm to 210 cm.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

A second form, soft, white and independent of the outer shell, is set within the concrete shell.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Wolfgang Tschapeller

The white form opens up and programs – makes habitable, if you wish – the concrete shell’s inner area, which is 2165 cm long and approx. 515 cm high.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Roland Krauss

These are two interleaved forms, each with a different hardness and materiality.

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Official name of project: St. Joseph

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Location: Lower Austria, Austria

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Project Team: Wolfgang Tschapeller ZT GmbH with Wolfram Mehlem and Jesper Bork

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Werner Feiersinger

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Sebastian Holzinger

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Sebastian Holzinger

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Wolfgang Tschapeller

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Above photograph is by Werner Feiersinger

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

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Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

Click for larger image

Single Family House St Joseph by Wolfgang Tschapeller Architekt

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See also:

.

Science Centre by
Wolfgang Tschapeller
Office Building VDAB by BOB361 Casa Doble by María Langarita & Víctor Navarro
| 26 comments

Posted on Tuesday, January 25th, 2011 at 12:44 am by Catherine Warmann. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • jomirod

    How is this no collapsing? Terrifying!

  • James

    I know half the purpose of architecture today is to design stuff that looks cool on blogs, but I'd prefer something with windows at eye level.

    You'd think by 2011, architects would have started to figure out how to make houses that are more accommodating and utilitarian than your average 19th century barn.

  • Chris

    So let me get this straight; the triangulated interior form isn't related to the exterior shell at all, seems to take up a lot of space, added considerably to the expense, and we're supposed to buy into it? Sorry, not me.

  • BBB

    it could use some furniture!
    't will be quite a task with all those angles.

  • EHAB

    I just love suspension buildings ,i wonder what will happen if you do that on a bigger scale.

    • Allan

      You would have more posts underneath.

  • DAE

    the exterior looks like a modified static caravan (not good) although the interior is pretty cool.

  • http://behance.net/lightstalks Ben Lark

    Thank god for the interior's sleek, quirky goodness because the outside is a sin

  • pet

    if there would be any connection between the exterior-interior it could be an interesting project. For now it's just a nicely designed interior that can be inserted in anything and anywhere. that's kind of sad.
    i like the details though ;)

  • Silke

    I think that interiors form is translated to outside perfectly- twisted windows and tilted roof exit prompts it right. Otherwise it would be pintles to use uncommon glazing for simple interior. Its nicely done- adds some surprise to whole project while it is balancing on simple minimalist and angular German architecture style.

  • nic b

    @ben lark. if we should thank god for the interior, then he's the devil as well. me, i like the concrete box on legs, or would have before they cut the windows in it, and added the carbuncle.
    @silke. i agree, the windows are utterly pintles…. :-)

  • Luca

    Now we can have a look to the caravans of the future.

  • Diego

    The Bath…room looks rather sexy. I don't in my opinion see what could work on this project. I call it a project because it reminds me of those white elephant projects, that Architects do that become un-inhabited very quickly. Which in my view is why there is no furniture already!? It does not look homely but rather more of a creative studio work-place. All that incredibly wasted space inside lacks function and logic, too much visual clutter.

  • http://hisius.wordpress.com/ hisius

    I like the concrete type of box but I don't understand the interior complexity in comparison with the outside simplicity.
    Interior concept creates a pressure on the outside and the openings, and an interesting structure is absolutely denaturated by an indoors so complicated.

  • Adams

    The bathroom is definitely the winner in terms of the interior although I think the multitude of angles kills it a little.

    I do rather like the exterior though. Call me a sinner…

  • Wan

    Genius! One of the most well crafted house I've seen in years….

    Would love to see more of Tschapeller's work constructed!

  • http://www.miglo.lt/en m.glodenis

    Its weird and strange. I like it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001857394783 Thomas Washington

    I love how gently this touches the earth, yet that interior seems a bit bizarre.

  • T.C

    the man looks very lonely … where are all his things ? he doesnt even have any shoes !

  • http://www.facebook.com/bauxetio Piero Teardo

    The openings on the outside look a little too random, and those stilts make it look like some circus caravan. There are better ways to work with ‘floating’ buildings.
    But, more than that, what’s with the interior? Maybe its crazy shapes would look good for a pavillon, or some shop, but i don’t see how it is supposed to be liveable, for a family especially. Where do you put furniture? What’s the point of that little void at the end of the bedroom? Why do I have to look at the toilet and whoever is sitting on it while going up the stairs? The same bathroom looks nice but will probably need plastic carpets or something to prevent people from slipping on the floor while getting out of the tub…
    In the end, extremely pretentious, and not even beautiful to look at, as far as my taste is concerned…

  • http://www.vihrogone.com Aleksandar

    wow!
    Due to my experience in the design field of artificial climbing walls and boulders I find the interior almost perfectly designed for bouldering, of course some climbing holds need to be added !!!

  • OWR

    I think it's more a gallery than a family house. Outside/inside is ok but a little bit out of the context…

  • fivedollarshake

    they created some very interesting spaces.question is whether this approach is going to improve the quality of living(even if it is just a vacation house) or make the owners feel uncomfortable..than again, im guessing the clients wanted something like that and are very happy with the result :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/peggy.gueredrat Peggy Guérédrat

    Interior is amazing !!!
    I can not imagine the interior with furnitures but the lights and stairs…. give you a can of purity in inside ^^

  • mirro

    although i think surprise is a good mean of expression when conceptually based, especially in public spaces.. here the difference between the outer skin and the shape of the interior space shocks the one who enters; and that one being the client, most of the time, this rupture seams rather schizoid to me than surprisingly beautiful..

    i don't want to comment on the formal quality of the interior; it may fit with the client's vision and improve his life, hopefully ..and in a way, i like it.
    but from outside, as an object, it completely disregards the context, doesn't help nothing improving the harmony of the place and from that point of view it's useless …sorry, i can't find no beauty in it.. mission failed

  • http://www.terryculver.com.au Terry

    I know it's a late comment – but that is THE most beautiful staircase I've ever seen.