One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

| 18 comments

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

Here are some photos of the recently-completed One Hyde Park residential development in London by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, which boasts the most expensive apartments in the world.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

Opened in January this year, the project comprises four linked towers of differing heights.One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

Floor plans are wider in the middle and taper towards the ends in order to maximise views out over the city.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

Circulation routes connecting the buildings are located between the blocks.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The development consists of 86 apartments with the top level of each block housing a two-storey penthouse suite.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

A reception, business centres, leisure facilites and retail units are also included.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The towers face Knightsbridge on one side and Hyde Park on the other.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

Photographs are by Nick Rochowski.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

More projects by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners on Dezeen »

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

More residential architecture on Dezeen »

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The following information is from the architects:


The brief was for a landmark development which complements and enhances the rich textures of the existing local architecture, whilst creating a structure which integrates well with the neighbouring buildings.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The existing rooflines - a dynamic and prominent feature of the local context - are characterised by the cupolas, turrets, gables and chimney stacks of the adjacent Mandarin Hotel.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

Detailed analysis of the context suggested that the buildings separating the Park from Knightsbridge were disjointed and varying in height, style and composition, resulting in a varied architecture along the northern side of Knightsbridge.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

With the exception of Bowater House, one of the key consistent features was the expression of verticality, ranging from the bays of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel to the verticality of the Hyde Park Barracks Tower.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

In recognition of the context - and in contrast to the design of the former Bowater House - a series of interlinked pavilions was conceived allowing permeability and offer views of Hyde Park from Knightsbridge.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The separation of the pavilions was conceived to create a stronger visual connection between Knightsbridge and the Park than previously existed.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The relationship of the pavilions with each other and with their neighbours followed a radial pattern emanating from a central point well within the Park.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

This resulted in a complementary alignment with the immediately adjacent buildings of Wellington Court and the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, as well as reinstating, as close as possible, the sweep of the original road and pavement alignment to the northern edge of Knightsbridge.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The shaping of the pavilions - which widen towards the centre of the site and taper towards the perimeter - allows for oblique lateral views from each pavilion towards Knightsbridge to the south and the Park to the north.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The pavilions vary in height, responding to the existing heights of Wellington Court to the west and Mandarin Oriental Hotel to the east.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The circulation cores are located at the ends of - and between - each pavilion. These provide both primary and secondary access.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The detailing of the cores is intended to be as light and transparent as possible, to maximise visual connections between the Park and Knightsbridge.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The form of the residential pavilions and their separation at the cores breaks down the overall mass of the development and seeks to create a roof profile that does not compete with the mass of the neighbouring Mandarin Oriental Hotel.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The upper levels of the pavilions are deliberately intended to resemble the roofscape of the immediate context in terms of colouration and texture.

One Hyde Park by Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners

The base of the proposal responds to the differing terrains of the Park and Knightsbridge sides, at those places where they provide a street frontage.


See also:

.

Leadenhall Building by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Shard 2012 exhibition by Hayes Davidson and Nick Wood 100 11th Avenue by
Jean Nouvel
  • http://www.facebook.com/finlay.mcphail Finlay McPhail

    No Pictures of the inside?

    I've been in one on a site visit. Fantastic views. I'd love to see what the penthouses are like though.

    The prices are outrageously high.

  • http://www.nickspriggsisinterestedin.com Nick

    Can't wait to see the McLaren showroom in the bottom

  • felix

    pretty horrible. trying to pretend these respond to the verticality they've imagined in the surrounding buildings and calling them pavillions is a joke.

    one of the sketches shows what looks like som nice public space on the ground floor though which is good, although it may end up being festooned with security gates

  • Keef

    You would think as the most expensive apartments they would actually look nice!!

  • zecks

    At £65,000 per sq.m i think they could have done more

  • Simon

    You know you're in trouble with a design when you have to do some diagrams to explain how good it is once you've finished and had it photographed.

    Not really appropriate for the street in my opinion. Not a lot of poetry to this one.

  • neohaus

    Outstanding world class location. Very handsome building.
    I would like to see some interior photographs.
    I would love to live here — if only I had $10-200 million for one of these units.

  • http://www.kentbrushes.com Ben

    They have about as much grace, good looks and creativity as a potato. For those reasons I shall not be buying one ;)

  • dan

    they look amazing, cant wait to go for a look.

  • mcmlxix

    Context is key, and any building (unless it is insanely great) that isn’t contextual is like nails on a chalkboard. However, I don’t know the area, so I cannot comment on context.

    In them self, I like the buildings. They seem to pick up where Modern left off in the mid 60s, as if that last 45 years never happened. That said I’m typically not a fan of a series of identical buildings. What I think makes these bearable is the varying heights.

  • thinanshop

    i love it. it says, 'look at us!' rather 'look at me!'

  • JJC

    This project is programmatically and constructionally brilliant – as is to be expected from RSH+P. The architecture of this practice and Foster's will in time come to define the architectural progression by this generation in the UK (whether you like it, or not). For the past few decades, these practices have been producing high quality projects continuously; innovative architecture of it's time and place.

    Rogers and Foster are both supremely good at balancing the conflicting needs of architecture to fit in it's context both physically and as part of the chronology of human development. Neither architect has ever practiced architectural fashions, or designed for the 'journal photograph'. Both architects have however contributed to architectural history, through their project's success in all aspects of design from social through to technological; the aesthetic is secondary and consequential.

    The petty baseless and frankly intellectually devoid comments of jealous designers will be outlived by the legacy of this project, and it's architects.

    I am becoming increasingly worried that architectural practices who achieve mainstream media recognition become 'uncool' to architects in the same way that mainstream bands become 'uncool' to some music fans.
    Architecture should be studied thoughtfully and intellectually. This trend of superficiality is damaging to the more meaningful quality of architecture.

  • jacko

    the building is not for value except it's location.

  • NAR

    They're are fantastic, more of it I would say…much nicer than the usual standard modern residential block you see everywhere.

  • dean

    @JJC, I don't think this can be considered a 'legacy project' by any stretch of the imagination for RSH+P in the same way as Madrid airport or the Lloyds building. Sure, its well executed in terms of construction but it really has nothing else going for it. I assume you have been there, the first things that strike you are the relationship to the street feels really uncomfortable and imposing, with tall narrow courtyards between the buildings, the architectural feel is bland, repetitive and akin to an out of town office development dropped in Knightsbridge. Maybe Chelsea Barracks had a lucky escape!
    Also to refer to a trend of 'superficiality' in architecture when this a vanity project for the super rich seems a little bit ridiculous!

  • Jay

    @JCC

    Can only assume you worked on this project or are in some way associated with it as your comments seem decidely ill judged and in your own words baseless. To believe the comments above are made out of jealousy from architects who dream of being able to design like Rogers or Foster is naive, laughable and deeply arrogant. Bost of these practices are well past a time when their output could have been considered either intellectually interesting or relevant, this pretty much stopped at Lloyds and HSBC. Every now and then Fosters will produce something vaguely interesting from a technical point of view, but on the whole they have done little to enliven the world of architecture and are unlikely to ever do so again.

    And what a bizarre comment to suggest their aesthetic is secondary and consequential, anyon with a modicom or knowledge about contemporay architecture can spot a new Rogers or Foster building a mile off, second only to Zaha, they are the most style-centric offices working today.

  • airborn

    I have seen social housing projects by (MAD or MVRDV for instance) on this site and others that are more appealing and designed with more respect to the surroundings than this Miesian rehearsal.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Narges-Jannati/100001600253128 Narges Jannati

    How can I find its plans?plz help me…!__