Corner project by Guise

| 12 comments

Corner project by Guise

Swedish interior designers Guise have inserted these tall black free-standing cabinets throughout a Stockholm apartment.

Corner project by Guise

Top photograph is by Jesper Lindström

Called Corner project, the cabinets provide storage space and divide the apartment, which has no interior walls.

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Rasmus Norlander

The units come in three different sizes and are all of the same height.

Corner project by Guise

All functions are housed within the pillars, including the kitchen sink.

Corner project by Guise

Photographs are by Mathias Nero unless otherwise stated.

Corner project by Guise

More interiors on Dezeen »

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Jesper Lindström

More apartments on Dezeen »

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Jesper Lindström

More furniture on Dezeen »

Corner project by Guise

Here's some more information from Guise:


PROJECT BRIEF
The assignment was to redesign an apartment of 45 m² from 1900 on Jungfrugatan in an exclusive area in central Stockholm.

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Jesper Lindström

The client's request was to create storage space as well as giving the apartment a unique identity.

Corner project by Guise

CONCEPT
The main concept is based on breaking up the traditional sequence of rooms and functions to become a nonlinear and nonhierarchical arrangement of space.

Corner project by Guise

The previously strict spatial segregation, with kitchen, living room and bedrooms have been broken up by introducing a forest of columns that define the rooms.

Corner project by Guise

Since the apartment has no walls in the traditional sense, the spatiality is created by the pillars relationship to each other rather than by clear physical boundaries.

Corner project by Guise

PLANNING
The apartment is inscribed in a square of around 45 square meters. The entrance door is located in one corner of the plan, facing one of the apartment's two windows.

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Jesper Lindström

The previous plan had a wall that strict shared the apartment in the kitchen and living area. A small alcove was positioned close to the bedroom.

Corner project by Guise

All the existing walls were torn down and replaced with a forest of columns that separates the rooms from each other.

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Rasmus Norlander

Even the bathroom walls have been torn down, the toilet is housed in one of the columns, providing necessary privacy.

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Rasmus Norlander

Also the WC-pillar is freely positioned and is thereby able to be, like all other columns, walk around.

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Rasmus Norlander

All the functions associated to the apartment is housed inside the pillars.

Corner project by Guise

Above photograph is by Rasmus Norlander

The positions and size of the pillars derives from functional aspects. All volumes are specially produced for this project goes from floor to ceiling.

Corner project by Guise

The sizes of the pillars vary from 400x400, 600x600 to 800x800mm. The height is 3050mm for all pillars except the bathroom module.

Corner project by Guise


See also:

.

Home 07 by
i29
Apartment in Paris by Pascal Grasso Architectures Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair by Guise
  • http://individual.cl/ æon

    Too much black for my taste. But it look good in the homogeneous white background.

  • yuc

    Definitely impressive like a showroom; yet the pics made me think of the last scenes of Kubrick's "A Space Odyssey". Swedish people used to love homeliness I believe, given the long and dark winters?

  • anna

    USCH FY OCH BLÄ reminds me of the horrible narrow bookshelves from IKEA we had as tortured teenagers in Sweden in the 90's … and a whole flat of them. horrors!

  • Alexandr

    Now that's one very unusual solution!
    Hope one doesn't feel like being caught in a maze.

  • http://www.terryculver.com.au Terry

    Oppressive and claustrophobic.
    I wonder how long the owners will live with it before they decide to redecorate!
    Love those OTT ceramic heaters though….

  • ivan

    why should one deliberately turn their flat into a labyrinth?

  • moana

    Perfect for my taste and lifestyle. If someone thinks it's too monotone, you should consider or imagine adding great colourful paintings here and there or a massive colourful chair/sofa or just some accesorize to lighten up a bit – it would look great. but otherwise, perfect, very smart solution, looks like multiroom appartment.

  • kim

    Amazing composition. There s a real work on space.
    As usual most people here see the surface of things without really understanding the real architectural vision. No wonder why architects have become CAD monkey or 3D geeks, understanding of space has been a lost cause.

    The network of furniture breaks the entire space creating areas without divisions. This real creativity with space brings vision of density but as well of mystrerious interaction. 45sqm looking like a forest.
    This project is as exciting as Sou Fujimoto's work…
    Bravo

  • Nathalie

    how do you use the restroom ?? …just curious

  • http://www.interiordesignstaging.co.nz designandstaging

    blow me down, it's a server room!

    Thin black towers with volumes of data stored inside.

  • makitamakita

    like it a lot, especially the bathroom, apart from the soulless and unpractical kitchen.

  • jlen

    Seriosly oppressive! Constantly under attack from the bloody furniture!