Firmship 42 by Studio Job

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FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

Artists Studio Job of Belgium have fitted out the interior of this private boat with teak, Corian and nautical iconography.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

Upholstery, furniture details and a stained glass window incorporate seafaring symbols like anchors, ship's wheels, skull-and-crossbones and sea creatures.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The vessel is coated completely in shades of grey with teak doors, furniture and interior fittings plus Corian surfaces in place of the usual plastic found aboard boats.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

Called Firmship 42, the boat was originally commissioned by Casper Vissers, founder of the Moooi furniture brand, for his family's own use but there are now plans to collaborate on a 60-foot version under the Firmship brand.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The shell was created by boat designer Willem Nieland.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

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FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

Photographs are by R. Kot / D. Cordner.

The following information is from Studio Job, written by Jeroen Junte:


A FLOATING WORK OF ART

The new Firmship 42 is a classic boat with a modern look. With its artistic design, Studio Job has modernised centuries-old nautical traditions – without losing any of today’s functional comfort.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The Firmship is a classic boat of the type that was still being built fifty years ago; an honest boat exuding confidence that will still be admired fifty years from now. What makes the boat even more striking is that literally everything is grey, from the railing and the bollards to the sundeck and even the throttle. Yet the Firmship is anything but drab or boring. Bold, or firm actually: a Firmship.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The boat has been finished with the craftsman’s precision, reinforcing its timelessness. Teak has been used for the doors, the outdoor furniture and the interior finish. The wood used for the cabin’s interior has been finished in such a way that the grain of the individual planks is seamlessly joined. Even the captain’s seat has been custom-made for the Firmship. Comfort is luxurious but not obtrusive; warm, rather, and welcoming.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The boat’s forceful and bold exterior, designed by nautical architect Willem Nieland, contrasts with its refined interior that was designed by Studio Job, the design duo whose artistic ornaments have earned them a worldwide reputation. With great subtlety, icons of our seafaring past have been worked into the interior, but given an unexpected twist.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The sofa is upholstered in prints showing anchors, Moby Dick and a skull and crossbones. A stained glass window between the cabin and the pilothouse displays the same ‘iconography’. At Studio Job, dream and reality become one.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The interior can be added to as desired, with items selected from Studio Job’s custom-made designs – a bronze ship’s bell, for instance, or a marquetry cabinet. Even people who do not normally like boats are attracted to the Firmship. It is more than just a boat: it is a home.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

Currently, the Firmship is only available as a 42-foot boat. The next step will be the launch of a Firmship 60. But regardless of length and design, each Firmship is a boat that, though completely grey, also has a stained glass window in the cabin and a helm with a skull and crossbones. It is a boat that radiates both the toughness of the archetypal sailor and the timeless beauty of a sculpture.

FS 42 by Studio Job for Firmship

The Firmship creates a new nautical tradition: the floating work of art.

- Jeroen Junte, design and art critic, October 2010


See also:

.

B60 Sloop by John Pawson
and Luca Brenta
YachtPlus by
Foster + Partners
All our stories on
Studio Job
| 10 comments

Posted on Friday, February 25th, 2011 at 4:53 pm by Catherine Warmann. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • Pedro86

    why corian in a boat…… I can think of heavier materials to use, but not many. Unless the images are not representative it looks like a nice thick 6mm coating of corian. Wouldn't like to be in that in rough seas! Otherwise…exterior plush…interior….less plush. That is all.

    • nofelix

      To be honest they're probably going to be ambling along at a couple of knots by some sickenly idyllic seaside ex-pat yachting town, where seaworthiness and rough weather are not much of a concern.

  • pietdejonge

    it seems as if every little detaill has been executed with the utmost attention, then why are the keyhole and doorknob off centre?

    • stinkpotsam

      Yeah, that would be bothering me too, it’s just not right.

  • http://lettuceoffice.com nico

    *spiderman took photo #7

  • Mr X

    i think as they have used corian they could have put a little more thought into the actual sink bowl!

  • Mario

    Oh wat vet dit! Studio Job, als jullie dit lezen; complimenti!!!

  • polly

    I don't know if this is a compliment to the designers/artists but Studio Job have become a cartoon factory.
    It is one thing to be consistant, it is another to become static in your progression.

  • http://fizzfieldgrass-art.jimdo.com Fizz

    I'm afraid only the Italians know how to do boat interiors….oh yes, and the exteriors too.

  • NEiide

    Looks like the interior of, I don't know, a boat?