CTYN Internal Garden House by Archi LAB. t+m

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CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

Family members can see into all rooms across the central courtyard of this Japanese house by Sapporo studio Archi LAB. t+m.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

Located in Chitose City, Hokkaido Prefecture, the CTYN Internal Garden House is located in a field where neighbouring houses are to be built on three sides.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

The outer walls have no windows in order to block out views of the buildings to come and focus inhabitants' attention on the garden within.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

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The following details are from the architects:


As part of a new residential area in development in Chitose City, Hokkaido, a former farming field has just been marked off into divisions, each of which has 40 percent legal building coverage ratio. Under the law, minimum space of 1m inward from the boundary has to be kept for snow piles in winter season.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

On top of this, the site would be bounded on three sides in east, west and south by neighbouring houses in prospect of future development in the area.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

Minimum of 2m gap between the houses combined with the 1m allowance on the neighbour's side as well as the non-building area on the site, all of this seems to be enough empty space, however, considering that the entire area is surrounded by a vast open landscape, this marginal space is not actually much.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

As we cannot speculate the future neighbour housing to come, the task was to design these 3 facades in a way that it would still create a comfortable space inside regardless of the surrounding situation. We also decided to create an internal enclosed garden in middle of the house, a void that serves as daily multi-purpose space to make most out of the 60 percent non-coverage area of the site.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

The 7.1m x 5.3m garden is positioned to south from the centre of the site, the living spaces are laid on a spiral on different levels: from the laundry room on half basement, living room, tatami floored stairs, and bedroom, which surround and lead to the internal garden. By having a structure where family members could see others in the rooms over the internal garden, it retains as an open and comfortable house overall.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

By enclosing the entire house from the outside and making the internal garden a centripetal force, controlling the opening of the space corresponding to the spiral layout of the rooms, we managed to design a structure where the residents can enjoy the physical positioning in the house with other family members depending on where they are and how they move around.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

Considering that it is a space that lies in the vast horizontal landscape, we managed to keep the height down to one storey, hence in winter half the house would be covered in snow.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

As the house is enclosed within itself, even when surrounded by the prospect neighbouring houses, the house would serve as a valley in the residential area, and we hope that this house would remain as a void that merges into the lives of neighbourhood.

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

'The Internal Garden in Chitose'

Location: Chitose City, Hokkaido
Type of Building: single resident

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

Site Area: 213.3 sq metres
Building Area: 85.2 sq metres
Total Floor Area: 103.8 sq metres

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

Structure of the Building: wooden structure
Scale of the Building: 2 storey building
Construction: Marushige Akasaka Construction

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m

CTYN Internal Garden House by archi LAB. t+m


See also:

.

Inside Out by
Takeshi Hosaka Architect
s
Edge by Apollo
Architects & Associates
House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi & Assoc.
  • Juliano

    Where is the garden? Or you just call "garden" a courtyard full with tiny stones? Because i don't see any garden inside this house.

    • Danillo

      One of the most famous gardens in the world (Ryōan-ji) is "tiny stones," try to consider the project from the Japanese perspective…

      • Juliano

        In the human perspective, i can not consider as garden a landscape made only of hard materials, even if they are natural, even in Ryoan-ji, you can see the contrast between the inside stones and dry surfaces and the outside and the plants, trees, green, birds, and other live elements. This is a garden only in the perspective of "design", or art, not in the perspective of what human life is, and what the human need to live on the planet. Things could be better if architects really want to improve the environment where people live, that is made of live beings, not only images, or art pieces. Specially now, when the "japanese perspective" of "development" is totally in a deep crisis. The problem of design now is not only if something is beauty or not.

        • Ramiro

          your problem is your dogmas! you should be careful of the terms you use in order to not produce inaccurate concepts/images. everything that you said, must be preceded and emphasized with the expression, I think, I like/I don't like.
          It's so dangerous make such statements:

          "This is a garden only in the perspective of "design", or art, not in the perspective of what human life is, and what the human need to live on the planet."

          firstly you eliminate others point of view, secondly you are elevating yours as the only and mighty one! that's what I call fanaticism! I's not healthy and doesn't allow dialogue.

          I just hope you have a problem using words…

          lolol

  • http://www.coatesdesign.com Seattle Architect

    I think that the "garden" is the interior courtyard. It's an Asian garden–plants aren't necessary.
    I am curious about the exterior facade. Why no windows? Was that the client's idea? Is this building at the edge of the property line on all sides?

  • pim

    if there is one thing you don not want to do, it's looking in to your family memebers'rooms..

  • http://www.wy-to.com Yann

    openess, generosity, dialogue, interaction, exchanges… Welcome to a world where people are feared from each other and can only communicate through screens!

  • igorrrro

    The last picture: it looks like a TESCO… don't like it.