Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

| 9 comments

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

French practice Moussafir Architectes have completed this refurbishment and extension of a house in the Parisian suburbs, adding deep larch wood window frames.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Named Maison Leguay, the project comprises two new matching blocks constructed either side of the original brick house, creating an enclosed inner courtyard.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

The connected trio of blocks are separated from one another by narrow glazed gaps.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Photography is by Jérôme Ricolleau, other than where stated.

More stories about extensions on Dezeen »

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Here is some more information from the architects:


Maison Leguay

Cloning a house

In order to preserve the character of this classic brick-and-stone suburban house while doubling its surface area, we decided to duplicate it by adding two side blocks, two ‘clones’ set at right angles to it, where there used to be a shed.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

This arrangement has allowed us to create a harmonious trio of buildings set around an inner garden, while preserving the street alignment.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

The new home is made up of three dissociated elementary blocks, a square and two rectangles, separated by two narrow glazed gaps and with matching sloping roofs.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

With its new truncated roof that lets the light from the south into the living areas laid out on the north side, the ‘stem cell’ blends in so well with its extensions – thanks to its shape, the materials used and its fenestration – that it becomes hard to distinguish the old from the new.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

The load-bearing brick used for the original house has been used in the extension as an external protection for its insulation, while rough load-bearing breezeblocks used for the extension line the existing walls, which are thus insulated from inside.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

To complete the fusion, large larchwood boxes with windows form glazed openings in all three blocks, offering visual perspectives through the house and into the garden that runs along its north-south axis.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Client: private (Laurence et Frédéric Leguay)
Architects: Jacques Moussafir with Gilles Poirée

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Address: 2, rue Charcot, 92270 BOIS COLOMBES

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Brief: Restructuring and extending a house
Budget: 360,000 €. ex tax

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

NSA: 232 sq m (114 sq m restructured + 118 sq m new build)

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Date: 2005-2011

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Photography below is by Géraldine Bruneel.

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Click above for larger image

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Click above for larger image

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Click above for larger image

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Click above for larger image

Maison Leguay by Moussafir Architectes

Click above for larger image


See also:

.

Balmain House
by Carter Williamson
Hoxton House
by David Mikhail
51A Gloucester Crescent
by John Glew
  • http://twitter.com/nofelix @nofelix

    Weird project, some aspects of astounding beauty, coupled with a lot of mundane and awkward fumbles. Like the shower in the bedroom is a daft idea; but the composition of the bare faced brick wall, the window and the shower is so perfect. The response to site context is too brutal as well, what have these cute French houses done to deserve such aggression from the architect?

  • http://cargocollective.com/arcalign ArcAlign

    Superpretty. The muted palette sets off those larch windows wonderfully and the fairfaced concrete block looks amazing…Giseajob

  • Matt

    Lovely. Very nice use of materials. I don't see the aggression but agree a steamy shower in the bedroom might be good in a hotel but would tire in real life. Hard to believe it could be built for that budget. In Sydney you'd get a caravan and tarpaulin for that kind of money.

    • Katsudon

      Wow, Sydney is that much expensive?
      It's a nice budget in France for this kind of restructuration.
      Here half of the project is restructuration and half is new.
      I guess a full 230 sqm project would be at least 20-30% more expensive.
      And the budget doesn't count the site + original house value. Together you probably get something around the 1~1.2 million.

    • http://twitter.com/nofelix @nofelix

      photo #6 shows the house in more context, to me it looks like it's sulking next to its light and airy neighbours

  • Jay

    I couldn't disagree more with @nofelix, this design gives off no aggressive feelings (to me). It looks cozy and warm. The 'shower in the bedroom issue' could easily be solved by a simple glass divider wall and adds a rather exotic feel to the space. The combination of materials works really well and it's nice to see the minimal use of wood, it really pops! Cheers.

  • http://www.facebook.com/adi.lamror Adi Lamror

    Wow. It sure does depress me even looking at it. Maybe its just me, but black bricks remind me of the inside of a furnace. Black bricks remind me of a war torn region. And the interiors make the house look like its a reminder of what was once a happy home. I love stark minimalism. This is just depressing. Sorry, design fail all around.

  • theEgyptian

    Question…

    Because of the extruded window frames, how do solve the thermal bridging that will occur? How do you insulate the window frame and the brick at their junction?

    Apart from that, great use of raw materials + the black brick with wood works great.

  • http://elelefantealbino.blogspot.com/ Mora

    The materials combination makes the interiors look gentle. But I tend to think of that kind of house like showcases, where you can’t add or take away something without devaluing the aesthetics. Sure it looks like a great work, but I can’t help think about the people living there and how the landscapes would be changed by the mere daily activities.