Ruta del Peregrino: Lookout Point
by HHF Architects

| 12 comments

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Lookout Point by Swiss architects HHF is one of eight new architectural structures along La Ruta del Peregrino, a 117km-long pilgrimage route in Mexico.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

The route through the mountain range of Jalisco has been popular with pilgrims since the 17th Century, and the new structures are intended to provide shelter and serve as landmarks along the route.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

This year pilgrims were able to use the Lookout Point shelter for the first time.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Six of the eight structures along the route are now complete and the final two are under construction.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Other architects who have contributed are Fake Design, Luis Aldrete, Christ & Gantenbein, Dellekamp Arquitectos, Elemental, Godoylab, Omar Orlaineta, Periférica and Tatiana Bilbao.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Dezeen published proposed images of the Lookout Point back in 2009 (see our earlier story).

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Photography is by Iwan Baan.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

More stories about viewpoints on Dezeen »
More projects by HHF Architects on Dezeen »

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Here is some more text from the architects:


Ruta del Peregrino
Jalisco, Mexico

Ruta del Peregrino is a religious phenomenon centred and moved by the adoration to the virgin of talpa.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

La Ruta del Peregrino (Pilgrim’s Route) stretches out on a distance of 117 kilometers.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Approximately two million people participate each year in this religious phenomenon coming from different states of México to walk through the mountain range of Jalisco, starting in the town of Ameca, ascending to el Cerro del Obispo at an altitude of 2000 meters above sea level, crossing the peak of Espinazo del Diablo to descend to it’s final destination in the town of Talpa de Allende to meet with the Virgin of Talpa as an act of devotion, faith and gratitude.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

This religious voyage has taken place since the 17th century, for the pilgrims the act of faith is carried to a penitence, the conditions of the route are harsh.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

This sacrifice carried with austerity is an essential part of the promise or offering that become the ritual of purification.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

This project aims to provide the historical route with better conditions for the pilgrims as well as to maximize the social and economical profit for this area by taking advantage of this massive event.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Based on a systematic vision the project becomes a sustainable site with different layers of meaning.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

As we focus on the whole, the master plan consists of an ecological corridor with infrastructure and iconic architectural pieces that add to the religious ritual and also aim to appeal to a broader audience and allow the Route to have a flow of visitor beyond the religious.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

The focus is on the iconic narrative given to the Route with 7 pieces that strongly relate both to the extraordinary landscape and to the religious ritual, becoming the imaginary landmarks of a deeply rutted phenomenon.

Ruta del Peregrino lookout point by HHF Architects

Each landmark by a different designer, a group of individual dialogues with specific sites and intentions that add up, to weave a single story.

Ruta del Peregrino

  • michael

    nice design!
    rough concret! (ceiling)

  • nicey

    have to disagree michael; not just because as an atheist i find this an unecessary intrusion into a beautiful landscape; which is worth more respect and devotion in it's unviolated state, but also as a piece of design it's plain ugly.

  • pinche

    No worries… atheists can also love La Tourette

    • nicey

      i think you missed my point. it's a woefully banal lump of concrete; and no "deeply rutted religious ritual" justifies it's intrusion into a landscape that ought to be given greater respect.
      b.t.w. i love la tourette

      • http://www.dailygrail.com Red Pill Junkie

        It's not banal, since it tries to enhance the experience of those who —for their own personal (and maybe debatable) reasons choose to embark in this pilgrimage.

        I don't find it intrusive, since the materials and the shape allows it to blend in with the natural colors of the landscape —it's not like it's a highly reflective bright red edifice that's yelling "look at me!"

  • edward44

    Mexico. The land that time forgot. Can't imagine what an extra few meters higher will make in the contemplation of the mountains. But hey!. It's a commission.

  • ajua

    very nice design and dynamic, the shaped arches gives certain movement that remains the pilgrimage "walking and movement" …

  • http://www.butimtifferent.com Tiffany

    Looks like it should have bells in it.

  • http://www.8888888888888888888888.com/ 88888

    nice concrete

  • douglas

    Not, ugly at all. Who decides whether its an 'intrusion' , let alone unnecessary?

    Is a car driven to a beauty spot intrusive? Is a man-made coloured cardigan worn at the location an 'intrusion' obfuscating the natural beauty?

    All buildings are an 'intrusion' onto landscapes. This one blends-in well. To my eyes at least.

  • http://www.facebook.com/osmel.liriano Osmel Liriano

    My new upcoming project's admiration.

  • http://www.GregAllegretti.com Santa Fe Architects

    It's not quite Louis Kahn, but I like it.