Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

This farmhouse in Hokkaido by Japanese studio Hiroshi Horio Architects has a pointed observation deck where residents dry herbs.

Tohma-House-by-Hiroshi-Horio-Architects

In a rural location surrounded by arable fields, Tohma House has a large kitchen, living area and basement where various crops are prepared and stored during harvest seasons.

Tohma-House-by-Hiroshi-Horio-Architects

Rooms are divided across split-levels, connected to one another by both ladders and stairs.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The cast-concrete and timber structure of the house is left exposed on the interior, with a wood-burning stove located in one corner.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The following information is from the architects:


Tohma House

There exists the family life running harmoniously along the time of nature.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

Dreamt of creating a new home for the family where their lives would nestle deep in nature, step by step we weave precious matters into our design.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

Living in harmony with nature

The site is located on the rural outskirts of Tohma, Hokkaido.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The father works as a mountain guide, the mother paints with watercolors, and the son attends primary school and they live, work and farm together.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The family had been renting the farm house left behind by the farmer’s retirement.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

However they welcomed the opportunity of having the grandmother, who had been living by herself, to start designing their new house.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

After living in the area for some time, the family was longing to have a firewood stove could run through the night.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

They normally have to get up in the middle of the night to add more firewood in order to beat the early morning cold.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

This experience has taught them that fire wood is one of the most economical heat resources, regardless of the effort it takes to keep the stove running.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The lowest temperature during the midwinter in Tohma could go as low as minus 25 degrees Celsius, which reiterates the fundamental functions of houses to provide a well-insulated enclosure for families.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

Family life revolves around the changing seasons.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

At the end of winter, seedlings are planted.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The land is cultivated with the melting of the snow and various crops are nurtured until they are ready to be harvested in the fall.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The harvested crops are used for family meals, and they are also processed to be made into snacks or preserved food, to be sold as part of their family business.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

We were very moved by the way the family coexisted with nature’s severity, when we first heard the story about their everyday life throughout the year, probably because we felt their life is running along the course of nature, spontaneously.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

Space Composition

Through the large window in the lower level hall furnished with the firewood stove, you can enjoy the scenic view over rice fields and the Daisetsuzan Volcanic Group.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The interior spaces are filled with the natural light filtering through the FRP grating observation deck of the loft where the family dry herbs.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

In plan, the central open living space, the kitchen and the basement storage are laid out in a functional manner to manage plentiful harvests.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The tower like composition of such spaces forms multiple layers one on top of the other as if the natural light from the top was its core.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

The interior space with these continuous layers has the atmosphere of a barn attic.

Tohma-House-by-Hiroshi-Horio-Architects

Each individual can have their personal space, and still feel intimate with each other.

Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma House by Hiroshi Horio Architects

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Tohma-House-by-Hiroshi-Horio-Architects

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Tohma-House-by-Hiroshi-Horio-Architects

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  • kumakuma

    wow, i would love to spend all winter in that beautiful space!

    fantastic.

  • yuc

    I think every architect loves the appearence of unfinished timber structures; this design seems like the realization of that idea.

    But I wonder what the words about the fire woods and cold winters have to do with the design? This house cannot be heated at all. So I assume that the family lives somewhere else in winters.

  • http://widget.fx-exchange.com/ currencywidget

    It’s nice to see simple, clean designs. Less is More.

  • antonius

    `It’s nice to see simple, clean designs. Less is More.`

    I always wonder what architects mean if the are talking about `clean`.
    Looks a bit like early Venturi houses. Who I think was not very occupied with `less is more`
    Nice house thow.

  • http://www.GregAllegretti.com Santa Fe Architect

    How wonderful it would be if lumber of this quality were was available here in the US !

    This home may indeed be an all-weather structure with insulation on the exterior face of the wall and roof sheathing. The way that the floor plan is drawn suggests that this is the case.

    There is something oddly comforting for me about the plywood interior finish. Especially the bathroom and kitchen.

  • edward44

    Brilliant design spatially and materially but I'll have to take the architect's word that the house is well insulated. I suppose what the clients call warm would be some distance below my requirements.

  • John

    A look at the associated drawings indicates that there is sufficient wall thickness for insulation.