2011 Foster + Partners prize awarded to
AA School student for Haiti proposals

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AA student Aditya Aachi has been awarded the 2011 Foster + Partners Prize for a sanitation infrastructure concept in Haiti, which was severely damaged by an earthquake in 2010.

2011 Foster + Partners prize

The annual prize is presented to an Architectural Association School of Architecture diploma student whose portfolio best addresses the themes of sustainability and infrastructure.

Aachi's project, entitled Haiti Simbi Hubs, proposes the introduction of hygiene points that would include areas for bathing, laundry, lavatories, food storage and food preparation.

The winning project and the other six shortlisted entries will be exhibited at Foster + Partners' studio in October.

See Aachi's winning project here.

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Here are some more details from the AA School:


Helping Haiti’s Cholera Battle Wins AA School and Foster + Partners Sustainability and Infrastructure Prize

 

The Architectural Association School of Architecture and Foster + Partners are pleased to announce the award of the 2011 Foster + Partners Prize, which is presented annually to the Architecture Association School’s Diploma student whose portfolio best addresses the themes of sustainability and infrastructure.

The recipient is selected jointly by the AA School and Foster + Partners at the end of each academic year.

This year’s prize has been awarded to Aditya Aachi, of Diploma Unit 7, for his project Haiti Simbi Hubs. The project proposes sanitation infrastructure for Haiti and draws on the unprecedented need for cooperation between the Haitian Government and NGOs to combat cholera outbreaks.

A network of hygiene points known as ‘Simbi Hubs’ is planned, providing localised sanitation processes. Each Simbi Hub includes areas for lavatories, bathing, and laundry, as well as facilities for food storage and preparation. Water and sewage are treated on site and the hubs address issues relating to storm drainage and earthquake safety. All the elements required to build the new infrastructure are designed to be made locally, using established craft skills.

Aditya Aachi, and the other six shortlisted candidates, will be invited to exhibit their work in the gallery in Foster + Partners’ studio in October, when there will be a formal reception and a prize will be presented.

The themes of sustainability and infrastructure that underpin the award were selected to highlight themes of common interest to the AA and Foster + Partners and for their significance in contemporary architectural discourse more globally.

Mouzhan Majidi, Chief Executive of Foster + Partners, said: “This is the second year we have awarded this prize and in Aditya Aachi’s project we see it going from strength to strength. We hope very much that the debate this prize generates will encourage students to address themes that are of increasing relevance to architecture today.”

Brett Steele, Director of the Architectural Association School of Architecture, said: “The AA School is delighted to have participated in the judging of the Foster + Partners Prize. The work of this year’s winner indicates the enthusiasm and commitment shown by AA Diploma students to address challenging, topical issues in architecture. We are grateful to Foster + Partners for its continued support of the prize and the innovative work it encourages.”

Aditya Aachi, winner of the 2011 Foster + Partners Prize said: “The Earthquake and cholera outbreak of 2010 exposed the lack of both governmental and physical infrastructure in Haiti. The vision for this intervention is not only to create a sustainable system of public sanitation, which will be freely available to all, but also help to make sense of the largely unplanned city by making interventions that reinforce the public realm.”

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Posted on Friday, July 1st, 2011 at 12:56 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.