Alice by
Rachel Boxnboim

| 9 comments

Israeli designer Rachel Boxnboim has cast a ceramic tea service inside fabric moulds.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

Called Alice, the pieces retain the texture and seams of the fabric from which they were formed.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

Boxnboim pours the liquid clay into stitched moulds and gradually syringes it out again, leaving a thick layer clinging to the inside of the fabric.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

The cloth burns away when fired, leaving the delicate ceramic vessels behind.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

Boxnboim developed the process while studying at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

Photographs are by Oded Antman.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

Here are some more details from the designer:


My work started with my decision to saw a kettle. I took the measurements from my mothers old tea kettle and when i was finished - i had a mould.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

In this project I made a connection between a soft material (fabric) and a hard material (ceramic), perpetuating and preserving the properties of the fabric. The ceramic takes on the texture of the fabric and the appearance of the seams, and looks like a kind of hardened textile.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

The utensils are useful and contain an element of surprise.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

The work included trying out different patterns and different fabrics, the form of the utensil being determined by the pattern, or considerably influenced by the fabric, and changing from utensil to utensil.

Alice by Rachel Boxnboim

Materials and technique: porcelain; sewing and casting.

  • http://www.facebook.com/canayalago Camila Anaya Lago

    quiero hacer esto!!

  • ©Copyright

    Wonky archetypical products are sooo 2007.
    And in that same year Bas Kools did a great project with flexible moulds for ceramics; http://www.designboom.com/snapshot/gallery.php?SNhttp://www.baskools.com

  • swift kick

    Really nice project. I like the cups that have been bound in the middle. The edges looks slightly sharp though. It reminds me a bit of the work of Bas Kools:
    http://baskools.com/flexible-ceramics-g1/
    http://baskools.com/flexible-ceramics-g2/

    • slow punch

      yes, but these are actually attractive.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/yigalh/ Yigal David Hachmon

    Boxnboim –
    The Hachmon's are proud of you!

    The time-lapsed movie clip show it as easy quick task, but i'm sure it isn't and takes lot of effort.
    Do you have any copyrights on the process? ©

  • jane

    it reminded me too of bas his work, seen his research on textile/flex mould in the london exhibitions…

    but I suppose these are bit more female forms

  • http://www.baskools.com Bas Kools

    Great to see others are taking up the flexible ceramic process to make it work in their own way. Good luck with it!

    Rachel, if you want drop me a line to keep in touch about the ceramics. I am curious to your future plans.

    Best,

    Bas

  • Dee

    This is really lovely. A very unique and creative out of the box approach. I like how each piece retains the texture of the cloth and every piece is different. Looking forward to more stuff!

  • swinska gorska

    in short: I think it is one of the most wonderful designs I have ever seen. I am enchanted! When and where can it be bought?