House 20 by Jolson

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House 20 by Jolson

Australian architects Jolson have completed a house in Melbourne where cantilevering concrete slabs appear to balance on top of a bronze garden wall.

House 20 by Jolson

Residents enter the middle floor of the three-storey House 20 beneath this cantilever.

House 20 by Jolson

A basement floor is set into the sloping landscape below and contains an indoor swimming pool, gym, steam room and games room.

House 20 by Jolson

A small pond is also located on this floor, at the base of a light well that is driven through the full height of the house.

House 20 by Jolson

Living and dining areas are located on the ground floor, while bedrooms and studies can be found on the top storey.

House 20 by Jolson

Alarming cantilevers have featured on a number of buildings on Dezeen lately - see all the stories about cantilevers here.

House 20 by Jolson

See more stories about Australian projects on Dezeen »

House 20 by Jolson

Photography is by Peter Bennetts.

House 20 by Jolson

Here are some more details from the architects:


House 20

A series of concrete buttresses extrude from the sloping natural ground line reinforcing the north-south orientation. These rhythmic elements form a continuous datum upon which the first floor rests; concrete blades in an east-west orientation, which cantilever and stagger beyond the precipice of the bronze wall below. This craning assemblage hovers over an organic knoll of delicately curling asparagus fern, and shelters the entry below.

House 20 by Jolson

The house is a sculptural object. The brutal exterior surfaces of the forms jostling concrete blades penetrate the interior, diffusing the interior/exterior threshold and creating a series of individual rooms. The interior unfolds as it is engaged with, rooms fold into each other and are defined by layers not walls.

House 20 by Jolson

The interior is dissected by a 3 story void; an empty vertical room within a room. The upper and lower floors are veiled by a knitted stainless steel mesh which allows textured shadow to dance within the interior.

House 20 by Jolson

The kitchen & scullery are designed as a piece of furniture to divide the continuous living spaces.

House 20 by Jolson

The basement experience embraces dark tones, rich textures, and celebrates ambient natural light. There is a strong dialogue between surfaces and object; polished monolithic black stone, raw mild steel, black leather, knitted mesh, and ‘slick’ body of black water that embodies the indoor pool.

House 20 by Jolson

The first floor is the clients retreat with Master bedroom, dressing room and ensuite. The Study hovers above the landscape knoll and engages with the streets’ plane trees. The contrasting light and dark furniture pallet articulate ‘her’ study from ‘his’ amongst the blade walls.

House 20 by Jolson

The building faces north and draws in sunlight across its breadth. Along the terrace horizontal awnings extend toward the landscape to maximize shade as required. The void acts as a thermal chimney, drawing fresh air through and expelling above. At its base the pond has a cooling effect. The steel mesh veil reduces direct sunlight entry.

House 20 by Jolson

The design affronts the general fascination with mock architectural styles, or adorned boxes with inward looking spaces and a total lack of relationship with site and environment. It engages with the notion of grandness without drawing on imitation, decoration, porticos or columns. Anti-decorative, anti-column.

House 20 by Jolson

Location: Inner City Melbourne, Australia
Date of Construction Completion: 21/09/2010
Gross Floor Area: 1250m²

House 20 by Jolson

Practise Team: Stephen Jolson, Mat Wright, Abe McCarthy, Andrew Prodromou, Chloe Pockran, Sue Carr, Jaclyn Lee
Construction Team: Len Bogatin and Associates

Consultant team:
Arup Melbourne (Structural/Civil Engineer)
Medlands (Electrical/Mechanical/Hydraulic Engineer)
SBE (Environmental Consultant)
WT Partnership (Cost Consultant)
BSGM (Building Surveyor)
Aloha (Pool)
Urban Intelligence (Home Automation)
Julian Ronchi (Landscape)

House 20 by Jolson

Primary Materials used:
Structure: Concrete
Facade Undercroft Wall: Bronze Panels
Glazing: Frameless & Anodized Aluminium
Flooring: Timber & Bluestone
Internal Walls: Concrete, Plaster, Polished Plaster, Bluestone

House 20 by Jolson

Products used:
Lightwell Mesh: Locker Group
Timber Floorings: Eco-Timber
Lift: Kone
Air Conditioning: Daikin Ducted
Appliances: Miele, Subzero, Qasair
Door Hardware: Bellevue
Gas Fire: Realflame
Concealed Speakers: Stealth Acoustics
Home Automation: Urban Intelligence – employing CBUS
Garage Door: Ross Doors
Cabinetry Manufacture: Splinters Joinery
Bronze Panelling: Bronzeworks
Trenches & Grate: Aco & Stormtech

  • Ahmed

    Is it a house or a museum !!!

  • al matta

    It is definitely beautiful. Is it interesting? certainly not. The plans are predictable, the material selections are safe. The entire project seem consumed by the cantilever and yet the photos fail to provide one interesting vantage point relative to the interior of the house. A missed opportunity on such an amazing budget and what appears to be some rather informed wonderful clients. The furniture selection was interesting though..

  • john

    such extravagance ought be condemned

  • krimane

    it's so bloody jolly good to be wealthy.
    living in style is somewhat the "ultimate" art

  • Mark

    Exterior is great… Interior very standard.

  • http://www.builtfabricblog.blogspot.com Rube

    Agreed, a lot of effort for some very ordinary spaces.

  • Fami

    what ever , in the end i don't think any body will mind living in it !!

  • B & B Wood

    What a stunning home! Personally I think the integration between architecture and interiors is seamless.

  • composer

    aww… I hate the mirror in the eleventh picture!
    but exterior cool, indeed

  • A. Non

    Looks like an office building