Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

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Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

New York architect Stan Allen constructed this pavilion of bamboo scaffolding at a former airport in Taichung, Taiwan.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

Top and above: photographs are by Wei-Ming Yuan

The temporary Infobox structure displays masterplan proposals by the architect to redevelop the 240-hectare site.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

Above: photograph is by Wei-Ming Yuan

Drawings, models and projected animations are displayed on the ground floor of the pavilion, while a first-floor balcony offers a view of the progressing construction.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

The gridded scaffolding is composed entirely of bamboo sticks, which are tied together with metal wire.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

The bamboo structure will be completely recycled when the pavilion is eventually dismantled.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

Another former airport recently hosted an international design fair – you can watch a movie about that event here.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

Other bamboo structures featured on Dezeen include a nest-like den and a woven lattice restaurant ceiling, both in China.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

Photography is by Iwan Baan, apart where otherwise stated.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

Above: photograph is by Wei-Ming Yuan

Here's some further explanation from Stan Allen Architects:


Taichung Infobox

In 2009, Stan Allen Architect completed the master-plan for Taichung Gateway Park, a 240 hectare mixed use quarter to be built on the site of the former Municipal Airport in Taichung, Taiwan.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

The urban design proposal includes a long-term strategy to “grow” the site over time, with civic buildings, infrastructure and residential neighborhoods to be built around a large central park space.

Taichung Infobox by Stan Allen

In order to raise awareness of the Taichung Gateway project, and to bring the public onto this spectacular site, SAA proposed the immediate construction of the InfoBox, a temporary exhibition pavilion to display the site and the project. Throughout the life of the structure, drawings, models and computer animations will be displayed within, while an elevated overlook terrace gives the public a ringside seat to observe the process of construction.

Infobox pavilion by Stan Allen Architect's

Click above for larger image 

Responding to the need for fast implementation and making the most of a limited budget, the InfoBox re-purposes the ubiquitous bamboo scaffolding technology seen all over Asia. The bamboo structure is not only quick and inexpensive, it is a locally available green technology: all materials will be recycled at the end of the pavilion’s lifespan.

Infobox pavilion by Stan Allen Architect's

Click above for larger image 

The dense weave of the bamboo creates optical effects which will contribute to the iconic presence of the InfoBox. The systems are flexible and adaptive, both during construction and over the life of the project.

Infobox pavilion by Stan Allen Architect's

Click above for larger image 

Client: City of Taichung
Design architect: Stan Allen
Executive architect: W.B. Huang Architects & Planners
Project coordinator: Feng-Chia Design Center

  • Techne

    Two things:
    1. Great new use of a classic material.
    2. A scaffolding for construction! Zing!

  • Tanner

    God can be realized through all paths.. The important thing is to reach the roof. You can reach it by stone stairs, by wooden stairs, by bamboo steps, or by a rope. You can also climb up by a bamboo pole. (Eric Owen Moss)