The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

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The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Japanese architects 403architecture have turned the floor of this refurbished apartment in Hamamatsu into a huge chest of drawers.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

It was only during the renovation that the architects discovered the large void beneath the suspended floor and decided to use it for storage.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Clear, corrugated plastic fronts the new sliding drawers, while scaffolding supports shelves behind and the floor slabs above.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Sheets of white fabric hang like shower curtains from a railing affixed to the exposed concrete ceiling and circle the lower level of the open-plan living room.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

You can see more interiors that look unfinished here, including an office with wooden pallets for desks.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Photography is by Kenta Hasegawa.

Here's a few more words from 403architecture:


The Difference of Ebitsuka

While managing the construction process of an apartment in Hamamatsu, 403architecture [dajiba] discovered a deep false floor, changed plans. And we used the empty space to generate a new lifestyle.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

This building has only 15 apartments on 3 floors and it is located along the river. The room in focus is on the ground floor. During construction, we discovered this amazing underfloor space and we decided to use it.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Multi-purpose storage cabinets rest under the micro-mezzanine. We want to use architectural improvisation as a trigger to a more imaginative life.

  • http://twitter.com/tommypniewski @tommypniewski

    i love the rawness

  • helge

    sorry to say that, but you should have spent the money to blow this up and build something nice.

  • einfach_klasse

    A refurbished apartment ? Photograph it with grandma's furniture, framed family picture and hand-me-down potted plants and i might believe that it is.

    Its all so 'a-la-mode' to expose the bare concrete structure of buildings to give them that oh so raw and neglected 'warehouse' or 'pre-demolition office block' look but it is becoming all to common. Even the high street big chains and restaurants have jumped on the band wagon.

  • http://www.pasinga.com Antje

    pure and minimal – I like it – you can just start and live

  • edward

    Client run out of cash? Course not. Corbu will never die in Japan. Yea!

  • alex

    I'd put pigs in it

  • mik

    what is this? if it was a big shower would be great.
    I think this could be very nice but somehow it is cold and ugly

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001277630068 Chitra Mohan

    Why so much drawers needed first of all? Could have used the space for better usage as wellness spa etc.