Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto/acaa

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Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

The rear facade of this hillside house by Japanese architect Kazuhiko Kishimoto slides opens to reveal a graduated terrace with a sweeping view of the sea.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Located on a sharply inclining slope in Kanagawa, Japan, the three-storey Wind-dyed House appears from the top-floor street entrance to have only one floor.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Louvered shutters surround the glazed exterior walls and a shallow-pitched roof sits over the building on a set of wide timber eaves.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Kitchens and dining areas occupy the uppermost level, while staircases both inside and outside the house lead down to rooms on the middle floor below.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

The lowest floor is the smallest and contains just a hobby room and storage area.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Other popular Japanese houses we've featured recently include a spiralling house on stilts and one with three layers of walls and ceilings - see them here.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Photography is by Hiroshi Ueda.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Here's some text from the architects:


Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Wind-dyed house

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

A residential building located halfway up a cliff, overlooking the ocean. Thick clumps of trees that grow along the slope of the land surrounding the house cast a series of organic silhouettes that make the slope seem to come alive.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

We decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible, while also allowing the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape according to the contours of the terrain. This would allow us to minimize the impact of the building on its environment.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

The design of the walls plays an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that a building projects. As such, we also tried to prevent the walls of this house from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building's physical presence in relation to its environment.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

The various components of the building were structured in order to allow the inhabitants to enjoy a different view of the outside on each level. The first floor features a stone floor and concrete walls finished with plaster, while the Japanese paper screens fitted inside the glass reflect the shadows of plants and trees. The hard-edged surfaces and finishes coexist with the soft, muted tones of the Japanese paper.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

The second storey, in contrast, features an open-plan living space, the entirety of which can be opened up towards the ocean. A series of wide eaves stand between the outside of the house and the interior, which is articulated into smaller sections by a row of pillars.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Going down the staircase-shaped terrace allows one to gradually draw closer to the outdoor landscape. The section that divides the two different elevations on this floor provides seating throughout, functioning as a unique Japanese-style verandah (engawa).

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

A steel-reinforced concrete structure was used for the second floor, and a Vierendeel bridge structure allowed us to float a large, thin roof on top. The pillars consist of square cylindrical poles (measuring 75mm across) made of solid iron arranged in a densely packed formation using wooden modules (900 x 1800mm). By creating several areas of low-level rigidity, we were able to do away with the need for braces.

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Location: Yokosuka Kanagawa
Date of Completion: July 2011
Principal Use: Private House
Structure: RC, Steel
Site Area: 454m2
Total Floor Area: 286.93m2 (54.86m2/B1F, 131.22m2/1F, 100.85m2/2F,)

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Architecture : Kazuhiko Kishimoto / acaa

Wind-dyed House by Kazuhiko Kishimoto:acaa

Structural Engineer: Takahiro Suwabe

  • Domilly

    Quite simply beautiful. lets hear it for eaves!

  • Julius Jääskeläinen

    Yes, eaves. And no damn gutter. Instead: gravel strip on ground/terrace level for rainwater.

  • http://twitter.com/NICKROCHOWSKI @NICKROCHOWSKI

    lovely shots

  • edward

    Sinful luxury, But they do their own cooking! That's egalitarian.

  • http://twitter.com/WalnutGrey @WalnutGrey

    Truly fantastic house… but I think they need some more work on the interiors esp. some of the tiling and furnishing. I'd definitely want to change the table and chairs and that jacuzzi area is awful.

  • Colonel Pancake

    It's nice to see a Japanese house that hasn't been dipped in a lake full of white paint.

  • m.m

    simple but beautiful, present the zen spirit.