De los Austrias Chemist
by Stone Designs

| 4 comments
 

Products are displayed amongst an array of colourful metal wireframes at this pharmacy in Madrid by interiors studio Stone Designs (+ slideshow).

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

"We use colour as an international language that everyone understands," Stone Designs partner Cutu Mazuelos told Dezeen. "We love to use colour as a tool that lets people feel the atmosphere that we want to show them, turning the experience of buying medicine into a social event."

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

Some of the wireframe boxes sit on a wooden platform, while others are mounted onto the walls.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

Shelving colours shift from vivid red and pink on one wall to bright orange and yellow on another. Meanwhile, the checkout counter is finished in pale blue and features a white marble surface.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

Pendant lights hang from the ceiling and patterned tiles cover the floor.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

The shop is located beneath an old bridge, giving the space an arched ceiling.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

Other pharmacies designed in recent years include one in Athens with a facade punctured by Braille and one in Belgium with a sliding cross-shaped window. See more pharmacies on Dezeen.

Here's a project description from Stone Designs:


Farmacia de los Austrias The Farmacia de los Austrias (De los Austrias Chemist) is placed in one of the most emblematic areas of historical Madrid.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

Our initial idea was to create a new space typology, in which tradition and vanguard merge in such a subtle way that originate a slow and deliberate dialogue in which no element stands out of the rest, creating an almost musical harmony.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

Products are displayed in really thin metallic structures standing in the bluish walls, creating a sweet and warm chromatic range that makes us feel at ease. This space transmits that we are attended by real professionals, but with a more human touch than usual.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

Some details such as the white marble counter help to strengthen the concept of the “well done job” that oozes the old; while other materials like the tiled floor, embrace us in a warm and close atmosphere.

De los Austrias Chemist by Stone Designs

It is a project in which, due to its nature and small size, even the slightest detail has been taken care of, creating an enormous sensory universe that makes the visitor enjoy a most gratifying experience.

  • Des

    My grandpa used to do these kind of shelves. In the 70s in Brazil if you had a soldering iron you would make furniture for your bathroom, not for money.

  • Charlie

    Oh so much is to be said about this!

    Lets start off with a quote:
    “…lets people feel the atmosphere that we want to show them, turning the experience of buying medicine into a social event.”
    Really? Who in their right mind would call their runny nose or nausea or, heaven forbid, yeast infection (and everything related to it) an “experience”, let alone turn it into a “social event”?!

    Everybody can have a good look at your bought medicine on the wide marble counter. How’s that for a “social event”? How about comparing rash creams and taking notes?
    In a pharmacy, privacy and discretion are key!

    Further, I really like the shelves, and I LOVE the floor tiles. Just not in this context.
    Nothing about this interior makes me think “pharmacy” or “this is the spot to get medical help.” I simply don’t associate it with health, or an improvement of it, whatsoever.

    A part of the problem are the colours. Yes, we have a playful rainbow theme going on here, wich might fit for a toy store, but not so much for a pharmacy.
    Quote: “We use colour as an international language that everyone understands,”. Maybe Stone Designs should have done more research on colour and its language.

    Red, orange and yellow are the colours LEAST associated with health or its promotion. While red is a colour that raises the heartbeat and is associated with feelings of danger and passion, thus unfit for a pharmacy, yellow and orange trigger alert and are uneasy on the eye. Why did Stone Designs pick them?! Soothing blues and greens would have been the colours of choice!

    I imagine myself staggering into this pharmacy. I am sick, dizzy, sweating and in dire need of a medicine that gets rid of my fever. I would feel very uncomfortable in a surrounding that screams alerting colours, sharp, straight angles, pointy edges, thin metal frames and fragile glass. But maybe that’s just me.

    I have to admit, it is a refreshing interior and a courageous one for a pharmacy.
    But if I stepped into it, I would suggest it was a shop for cosmetics or some fancy brand. NOT a pharmacy.

  • Charlie

    Oh yeah and don’t get me started on the poorly slapped-together mixture of materials, shapes, colours and structures going on in the counter area.

    A sky-blue heavy block of unknown material, floating suspiciously asymmetrically on a wobbly-looking, pastel blue metal frame, topped off by a whitish-grey marble plate, all in front of baby blue, texture-free walls around light brown wooden racks with
    white backgrounds and glass shelves, inserted between concrete-like stone blocks, doing a poor job of covering up boring white drawers with silver metal handles.

    Yes, we see repetition of colours and materials, counter top grey walls, shelve background drawers in the back, but there is just too much going on for that to do any good.

    Please! Where is the thoughtfulness, the planning, the golden thread in this interior? Also, the choice of lamps is hideous.

  • greg

    Great job! Love it! Definitely I would feel much more confidence in that chemist than in any other green and white one.